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The Lyme doctor

By Joanne Laucius, OTTAWA CITIZEN May 9, 2013

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/health/Lyme+doctor/8363919/story.html#ixzz2Tb0Tiw9w

Dr. Ernie Murakami says denying chronic Lyme is ‘a big, major lie.’ Photograph by: Jenelle Schneider , Vancouver Sun

Dr. Ernie Murakami says he treated 3,000 patients for Lyme disease before he was forced into retirement.

The B.C. physician can no longer prescribe the long-term antibiotics he believes are necessary to treat chronic Lyme. But retirement hasn’t stopped him for directing people to physicians in the U.S. and Europe who diagnose and treat Lyme disease.

By his own count. Murakami has offered free advice to more than 7,000 people looking for help. He will be in Ottawa May 13 for a speaking engagement.

Murakami was the subject of a College of Physicians and Surgeons of B.C. investigation that began in 2005 and agreed to retire in 2008. He says his story has frightened physicians from treating chronic Lyme with long-term antibiotics.

In the world of conventional medicine, few agree that chronic Lyme exists. They maintain that Lyme is a convenient explanation for chronic fatigue and mysterious pain that is hard to diagnose, backed up by conspiracy theories and an increasingly powerful Lyme advocacy lobby.

In September 2011, the influential medial journal The Lancet published an essay authored by 13 medical experts from institutions like Harvard Medical School and Yale University who argued that people searching for information on the Internet see the websites of Lyme advocates and doctors as reliable sources, drawing attention away from evidence-based medicine.

Long-term antibiotic treatment is profitable for “Lyme-literate” doctors, they wrote. And it can be falsely reassuring to patients to believe they have a chronic infection so they don’t seek diagnosis and treatment for something else.

But Murakami says denying chronic Lyme is “a big, major lie.”

And he’s not backing down.

Murakami says diagnosing Lyme is a matter of a clinical diagnosis — that is, observations and reports from the patient about the symptoms, not just lab tests.

“I wouldn’t have wasted the past five years without some credibility,” says Murakami, who had studied bacteriology and immunology and got interested in Lyme when he treated a patient, a student who had been planting trees, in his practice in Hope B.C., about 160 kilometres east of Vancouver.

He had studied syphilis and says Lyme is similar in that it is also caused by a spiral bacteria called a spirochete.

According to Murakami, there are a couple of problems in the system: First, many people who are bitten by an infected tick don’t notice it and only go to see a doctor if they develop the telltale bull’s-eye rash. He says fewer than half of those who go on to develop Lyme actually get the rash.

Secondly, the approved test for diagnosing Lyme is the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, known as the ELISA test. This is a two-step process. Only those who test positive in the first part of the test go on to the second part of the test, known as the Western blot test.

Murakami says the ELISA test often produces false negatives so many people who have Lyme are not being diagnosed — and those who are diagnosed get only a 30-day course of treatment as recommended by the guidelines.

He maintains that months and even years of antibiotic treatment are often necessary to kill all the pathogens. Conventional medicine frowns on long-term antibiotics to treat Lyme — although this is sometimes done for decades at a time to treat acne, according to Murakami.

The other issue is that the magnitude of the problem is hidden because people are not getting diagnosed, he says.

Lyme diagnoses are much higher in Washington state just across the border from B.C., while multiple sclerosis diagnoses are much higher in B.C. Murakami believes some people are being mistakenly and unnecessarily treated for MS when chronic Lyme disease is behind the symptoms.

There is also a big differences on both sides of the border in terms of the proportion of ticks carrying the infection, with officials in states bordering Canada claiming a higher rate of infection for their ticks than neighbouring Canadian jurisdictions, says Murakami, who is skeptical that American ticks are more likely to be infected than their Canadian counterparts.

B.C.’s health ministry has extended the right to prescribe antibiotics to naturopaths and some patients are turning to this option, says Murakami. Ontario naturopaths can’t prescribe antibiotics, and there is currently no indication this is likely to happen in the foreseeable future, according to the College of Naturopaths of Ontario.

Murakami says he knows of five people who have committed suicide because they are overwhelmed and depressed by chronic Lyme.

“The medical world has a big divide. We owe it to the public to sit down and talk.”

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/health/Lyme+doctor/8363919/story.html#ixzz2Tb1FxVCq

Seffernsville resident goes undiagnosed for two years

by Paula Levy

After two years of being ill, Shaelene Robar, Seffernsville, has been diagnosed with Lyme disease. The 15 year old's mother, Gail, has been advocating on her daughter's behalf.

It took two years for 15-year-old Shaelene Robar of Seffernsville to get a diagnosis and begin treatment for Lyme disease. The girl’s mother, Gail Robar, would not give up advocating for her daughter until she received answers and treatment.

 In December of 2008, Shaelene suddenly became ill. She and her family thought her illness was simply the flu. But the body aches and fever continued long after a normal flu illness would have cleared.

 ”The doctor kept saying that she would just be better, that it was a virus and it would just go away,” said Gail.

 But the symptoms would not go away and Shaelene began to become more and more ill. Over the coming months her fatigue, nausea, dizziness and now stomach pain intensified. Her mother took her to see doctors and specialists but no one could pinpoint the cause of Shaelene’s illness.

 Gail said during that time Shaelene was misdiagnosed with multiple sclerosis, chronic fatigue syndrome, Crohn’s disease, figbromyalagia and a mental illness. No treatments for these diseases helped and over the course of nearly two years, Shaelene kept getting sicker and sicker. She was also once thought to have anorexia because the teenager had lost over 30 pounds.

Shaelene said she had to drop out of school in Grade 8 because she was unable to cope with the extreme fatigue, dizziness and pain. This year she is supposed to be attending Grade 10 but she was only able to go to school for five days at the beginning of the year.

 ”I’m nauseous and I’m too weak to even move half the time,” said Shaelene.

 Gail said she realized that Shaelene had been bitten by ticks the summer before she became mysteriously ill. Her mother noted since the Robars do not live in an area that has the type of ticks – deer or blacklegged ticks – which are known to carry Lyme disease, at first Lyme didn’t seem possible. Gail said the ticks in their area are dog ticks, but now she is convinced that they too can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.

 The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains that blacklegged ticks are the only carriers that can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.

 Research scientist Dr. Robbin Lindsay said in Canada, the blacklegged tick and the western blacklegged tick are the types of ticks known to transmit Lyme disease to humans.

 ”While there have been several scientific research studies demonstrating that on rare occasions other types of ticks including the dog tick and insects like mosquitoes, fleas and certain biting flies can be infected with the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, they are not infectious and cannot transmit the bacteria to humans,” said Dr. Lindsay.

 Despite not having the well-known carriers of Lyme disease in her backyard, Shaelene was clearly ill. And Gail maintained that her daughter had contracted the disease. Her physician screened the young woman for Lyme disease. But that test proved negative. Lyme disease tests are first screened in Nova Scotia. Only those who screen positive are sent for further testing to the national lab in Winnipeg. Gail said the screening test is not reliable.

 ”The test is not reliable whatsoever. Those people that don’t test positive are out of luck,” she said.

The unreliability of the test is also maintained by Jim Wilson, president of the Canadian Lyme Disease Foundation.

 ”The present testing methods used were shown to be faulty,” said Mr. Wilson, quoting a January 2011 study. “It has been misdiagnosed as everything from multiple sclerosis, to chronic fatigue, Parkinsonism, irritable bowel syndrome, various forms of arthritis, psychiatric issues, heart conditions, and on and on. Canada just happens to have the highest rates in the world of these diagnoses but very little Lyme.” The foundation believes that Public Health is underestimating the burden of Lyme disease in Canada.

 Still convinced that Lyme disease was the culprit for her daughter’s illness, Gail continued to advocate on her daughter’s behalf. She took Shaelene to Port Hawkesbury to see a family physician who is known to treat patients suspected of having Lyme disease. He was contacted but did not return calls. However, through this physician, Gail paid $500 to have her daughter’s blood work sent to American laboratory IGene-X Inc.

 That test came back positive. But even though Shaelene has a positive diagnosis, it is not accepted in Canada because the laboratory is not a government-run lab.

 Gail said now that Shaelene finally has a diagnosis after two years, she is currently being treated with antibiotics by the physician in Port Hawkesbury. Shaelene said this course of antibiotics began in December and she has some improvement.

 ”I’ve been able to eat a lot more,” said Shaelene. But the teenager is still weak. Her mother expects it will take some time before Shaelene is able to return to a normal life.

 The Public Health Agency’s website states there are several antibiotics which can treat the illness but the sooner treatment starts, the better. In addition, it states that people with certain neurological or cardiac problems may require intravenous treatment and patients diagnosed in the later stages of the disease can have persistent or recurrent symptoms requiring a longer course of antibiotic treatment

The symptoms of Lyme disease usually happen in three stages. The first sign of infection is usually a circular rash which occurs in about 70 to 80 per cent of infected people. It begins at the site of the tick bite after a delay of three days to one month.

 Other common symptoms include

 * fatigue

 * chills

 * fever

 * headache

 * muscle and joint pain

 * swollen lymph nodes

 If untreated, the second stage of the disease can last up to several months and include

 * central and peripheral nervous system disorders

 * multiple skin rashes

 * arthritis and arthritic symptoms

 * heart palpitations

 * extreme fatigue and general weakness

If the disease remains untreated, the third stage can last months to years with symptoms that can include recurring arthritis and neurological problems.

 -The Public Health Agency of Canada

 

posted on 03/15/11

— Will Carry Out Clinical Trials with Blood Systems Research Institute, Creative Testing Solutions —

BOSTON, MA — September 10, 2012 — Immunetics, Inc., has received a $3.7 million, two year SBIR contract from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, an agency of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to support clinical trials of a new blood screening test for Babesia infection.

“Babesia is among the top infectious threats to blood safety and, at present, there is no licensed test available. The NIH contract will allow us to address this gap in blood safety with the first cost-effective test designed for high-throughput screening of the blood supply.  We are honored to have been entrusted by NIH to carry out this public health mission,” said Andrew E. Levin, Ph.D., Immunetics Chief Executive Officer and Scientific Director.

Babesia is a parasite which is transmitted by the same ticks that transmit Lyme disease. While it is often asymptomatic in healthy people, Babesia infection can lead to severe or fatal illness, especially in immunocompromised patients. The parasites can remain viable in blood donations and infect transfusion recipients. In recent years, nine fatal cases of transfusion-transmitted babesiosis have been reported. Surveillance carried out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed over 1,000 cases of infection nationwide in 2011 — a number that appears to be growing. The US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) sponsored a workshop in 2008 focused on Babesiosis as an emerging threat to the blood supply, and the Blood Products Advisory Committee convened a meeting in 2010 to advise the FDA on approaches to blood screening for Babesia.

The contract award will enable Immunetics to bring its Babesia test, developed under initial NIH support, through clinical trials and regulatory licensure. The trials will be carried out in collaboration with Blood Systems Research Institute of San Francisco, Calif., and Creative Testing Solutions of Tempe, Ariz. Creative Testing Solutions currently tests about 25% of the US blood supply, including regions endemic for the parasitic agent. The Babesia test will initially be made available through Creative Testing Solutions’ laboratories.

“We look forward to partnering with Immunetics and BSRI in the development and FDA approval process of a Babesia assay for use in blood screening,” said Creative Testing Solutions President Sally Caglioti. “It is always our intent to offer innovative services that provide our customers with the best donor testing possible. Active collaboration in the development of diagnostic tests that fit the immediate needs of the blood banking community is the next logical step to support CTS’ mission.”

“When the screening test identifies antibody-reactive donors, we will enroll and conduct rigorous testing of donation-derived and follow-up samples from those donors so that we can more fully understand the natural history of Babesia infection in asymptomatic donors,” said Michael P. Busch, M.D., Ph.D., Blood Systems Research Institute Director and Senior Vice President for Research and Scientific Affairs at Blood Systems. “The information that we derive will help guide the development of policies on how the test can be used most effectively. It will also determine whether and how donors who have had a positive result on the screening test could safely donate in the future.”

For more information, visit the company’s website at http://www.immunetics.com or call 1-617-896-9100 or toll-free 1-800-227-4765.

Immunetics is a leading developer and provider of innovative tests for a variety of bacterial, viral, and parasitic diseases. Recently, the company received FDA clearance for its BacTx® test for bacterial contamination in platelets. The company has developed and markets other FDA-cleared products, including a test for Lyme disease, and is actively working on new tests for HIV and Chagas disease — both of which are known or emerging risks to the blood supply.

See full Article:

http://www.immunetics.com/pr_120910.html

THIS SHOULD READ…CHANCES OF GETTING LYME IN P.E.I- AS RARE AS BIRD SIGHTINGS!!
How sad the public will falsely trust these Articles from our Health care. Great comment from C.P.
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Prince Edward Island

Chances of contracting Lyme disease on the Island may be slim, but a recent increase of cases in Atlantic Canada is cause to be more vigilant, says P.E.I.’s Chief Public Health Office.

The disease is caused by a bacteria found in some deer ticks, and can be passed to humans through a bite.

The Public Health Agency of Canada recently said instances of the disease are on the rise across the country, with more disease-carrying ticks reported in Nova Scotia, New Bruswick, Manitoba and Ontario.

But Dr. Heather Morrison, the Island’s Chief Public Health Officer, said cases of Lyme disease originating in this province are non-existent.

“There’s never been a case of Lyme disease diagnosed in a human in P.E.I., who acquired the disease from a tick bite in P.E.I.,” Morrison said.

“Deer ticks can be brought in by migratory birds, for instance, so the concern is always to be vigilant. Given what’s going on in our neighbouring provinces, we’re certainly concerned about increasing Lyme disease in ticks.”

She added that some patients have been diagnosed with the disease on the Island in the past, but their tick bites always originated in other areas.

The public health office sends a letter to all physicians in the provinces around this time of year, reminding them to submit any ticks they find for testing, along with information on how to test for Lyme disease in humans.

Pets can also be susceptible to bites and Lyme disease. Morrison said Charlottetown’s Atlantic Veterinary College follows a similar testing procedure with any ticks it finds on animals.

The main symptoms of Lyme in humans include: The appearance of a rash, and non-specific flu-like symptoms such as headaches, fevers, aches and pains.

“Those symptoms usually start three to 32 days after a known, possible tick bite,” Morrison explained. “Lyme disease is able to be treated with antibiotics, and the main tests for it are… blood tests. Sometimes it requires initial testing, but also follow-up testing 30 days later.”

sbrun@journalpioneer.com

See link:

http://www.journalpioneer.com/News/Local/2012-05-23/article-2986526/Islanders-should-be-vigilant-of-Lyme-carrying-ticks:-Chief-Public-Health-Officer/1

À few interesting links:

Coyote Management in Prince Edward Island www.gov.pe.ca/…/fae_coyote_man.pdf

Birds Disperse Ixodid (Acari: Ixodidae) and Borrelia …
www.nabernet.com/mainfiles/…/1043.pdf

Biological control of ticks
www.peipfi-komdasulsel.org/…/CBPV_ …

Lyme Disease: The Perfect Storm Is Headed Our Way Leo Galland, M.D. | Apr 18, 2012 08:06 AM EDT

Blood-sucking ticks coming to a field and forest near you.

That may sound like the latest horror film, but unfortunately it is a reality due to a surge in ticks that spread Lyme disease this spring.

Fortunately, the media interest in Lyme disease appears to be growing with the threat. At the start of the month I was interviewed on Martha Stewart Living Radio about Lyme disease.

The Perfect Storm for Lyme Disease

A perfect storm happens when two conditions converge to amplify each other’s effects. Two conditions are creating what may become the perfect storm for transmission of Lyme disease this spring:

An unusually warm winter, which left deer ticks alive,hungry and looking for a meal.

A dramatic flip-flop in the acorn cycle: A large crop of acorns in the fall of 2010 and a very small crop in 2011 in the East. This means fewer mice for the ticks to feed upon, as I explain below.

These two conditions mean tons of deer ticks that are hungry and lacking their typical food supply. You could be their next meal.

Ticks Transmit Lyme and Other Diseases

The bacteria that cause Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, are transmitted to humans by the bite of a deer tick (Ixodes dammini).

Deer ticks live for two years and in their lifetimes take only three blood meals: the first as newborn larvae, the second a year later as immature nymphs and the third a season later as adults.

Mice and Other Rodents Carry Ticks Too

If you don’t see any deer and think the coast is clear, think again.

FULL STORY:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mobileweb/leo-galland-md/lyme-disease_b_1429984.html

Map of Lyme disease risk in the U.S.
For three years, more than 80 tick hunters combed sites throughout much of the U.S. with corduroy cloths to trap the insects. They were on the lookout for the black legged tick Ixodes scapularis. It is the main carrier of the bacteria that cause Lyme disease.
This new map reflects their findings and pinpoints areas of the Eastern United States where humans have the highest risk of contracting Lyme disease.
So far in Canada, Lyme disease has become established in parts of southern and southeastern Quebec, southern and eastern Ontario, southeastern Manitoba, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia as well as much of southern British Columbia.
Source: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/02/02/lyme-disease-tick-map.html?cmp=rss

So the lone ticks don’t just fall from the clear blue sky…..off of that one poor bird ? Huh ?!! …imagine that !! Yes dear Deer, you should force the issue ! Shannon Park – North end Dartmouth..the deer that graze by the new bridge ramp are the same ones from Bedford. The ticks your Vet’s are now pulling off your pets are testing positive for LD. How long will it take for Dartmouth to be endemic?

**************
More than 1,800 black-legged ticks were found on deer heads collected from hunters last year, and 183 more submitted to the state for identification were confirmed, compared with 29 found on deer heads the year before and 45 that were submitted and confirmed, according to the Ohio Department of Health. The ticks, some carrying Lyme disease, have especially shown up in eastern and southern Ohio.
The deer tick was first found in Ohio in 1989, and in the following two decades, only about 50 of the thousands of ticks found in the state were identified as black-legged ticks, state public health entomologist Richard Gary said. In 2010, 45 deer ticks were confirmed, giving officials their first indication of a change.

See full story:

http://www.bucyrustelegraphforum.com/article/20120120/NEWS01/201200304/Tick-population-out-control

Warmer winters bring tick-infested springs

Article by: KEVIN GILES, Star Tribune

Updated: January 20, 2012 – 10:47 PM

Disease-carrying pests don’t die off without extended cold snap.

“If enough ticks are able to find suitable conditions, they can survive from year to year and their populations expand,” said David Neitzel, an epidemiologist at the Health Department.
But just as warm winters can keep ticks alive, so can heavy snowfalls that protect them from harsh temperatures, Neitzel said. And that’s the contradiction — unusual warm weather this winter has ensured that even modest snowfalls melt quickly. Ticks also need wet conditions to survive.
“They’re more exposed so they can either freeze solid or dry out if they don’t have enough leaf litter,” he said. “Even if a bunch of them are killed, [their numbers] seem to recover.”
It’s that persistence that worries public health officials. Anyone who spends time in wooded and brushy areas should report symptoms such as fever and rashes to a doctor, Neitzel said.

See full story:

http://www.startribune.com/local/east/137802778.html

Animal Discovery- Infested House – ** Caution ** Not for the weak of heart

Published Wednesday June 30th, 2010
New Brunswick is one of a handful of areas listed on Canada’s watch list for Lyme disease hot spots.

Jacqueline Badcock, a zoonotic diseases consultant with the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, displays some of the information being distributed by the Department of Health to warn people about the threat of Lyme disease. She says there’s been an increase in the number of ticks submitted for testing in the past couple of years. The Public Health Agency of Canada has labelled the province as an area where the risk for exposure to the disease is high because the ticks that transmit Lyme disease are known to be established here.

The national agency is also keeping a close eye on parts of southern and southeastern Quebec, southern and eastern Ontario, southeastern Manitoba, Nova Scotia and much of southern British Columbia for the blacklegged ticks that can carry the Lyme disease-causing bacteria.

“(New Brunswick) is on the list because there’s a confirmed area – Millidgeville is a confirmed endemic area for Lyme disease – so there’s a reproducing tick population,” said Dr. Nicholas Ogden, director of the Zoonoses Division at the Centre for Foodborne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, a division of the Public Health Agency of Canada in Ottawa.

Read more here:

http://telegraphjournal.canadaeast.com/front/article/1115772

 

Brenda Sterling-Goodwin gives a factual talk about Lyme Disease, how it is contracted, and how it is treated when diagnosed. The talk was presented at the New Glasgow branch of the Pictou Antigonish Regional Library in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, May 6, 2010. This is part 1 of 4 videos that comprise the recording.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmWFniytJ3A

May 13, 2008 with the description: Daryl Hall talks about Lyme Disease

http://vodpod.com/watch/719144-daryl-hall-lyme-disease-interview

 

MONTREAL – In late July 2002, Westmount resident Maureen McShane was doing some weeding at her cottage in St. Donat.

“I reached behind my knee to wipe some sweat off of my leg when I felt something behind the knee. I pinched off a tiny object, about the size of a poppy seed, and it fell out of my fingers into the dirt.”

Thinking nothing of it, she continued working in the flower bed.

“That day in the garden, was to become the start of my descent into … a living hell,” the 56-year-old physician said.

“About two weeks later, I awoke with a horrible pain in all my joints. I had neck stiffness, and my muscles hurt. Six weeks later, I had facial and eye twitching and a number of other odd symptoms. It only got worse from there and I soon had chills, sweats and brain fog. I couldn’t think clearly and lost my memory moments after I said something. I couldn’t sleep.”

By Robert Galbraith, Special to the Gazette   May 9, 2010

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/health/Misdiagnosis+leads+year+living+nightmare/3004992/story.html#ixzz0xxaBPkky

Randy Sykes message to Lyme Patients asking patients to put aside their personal differences and act together for positive change. Mr. Sykes was a DOT working in Connecticut before being stricken down with Lyme.

He isn’t lazy, rides Harleys and is not someone to bellyache.

More information:
http://starkravingviking.blogspot.com…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tO-TVfeSTU&feature=related

 

Ticks can attack moose in droves, draining their blood and possibly killing them.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rsd2i-qFHK4

By JOHN McPHEE Health Reporter
Tue, Aug 24 – 6:44 PM

White-tailed deer will be getting a dose of pesticides along with their treats as part of an effort to fight Lyme disease in the province.

Deer bait stations are expected to be installed as part of a federal study in Bedford and outside Lunenburg next month, an official with Halifax Regional Municipality said Monday.

Similar stations have been very effective in reducing black-legged tick populations in the United States, said Richard MacLellan, manager of HRM’s sustainable environment management office.

 

Read Story here:

http://thechronicleherald.ca/NovaScotia/1198354.html

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

By David Cubberly, Special to Times Colonist
 

 

It’s astounding that a single Victoria veterinarian sees more Lyme disease in dogs yearly than are “confirmed” by the Centre for Disease Control for humans across B.C. (“Tests spot tick-borne disease in retriever,” June 26).

How can it be that we see only four to six cases a year of Lyme in humans if one vet sees a case a month of tick-borne disease in dogs (and most often Lyme)?

I hope the standard of care given Annie the retriever will one day be available to people in B.C. Right now it’s not. Annie’s vet suspected tick-borne illness, recognized the need to test for Lyme disease and knew enough to also test for other tick-borne illnesses.

Humans come to doctors with known symptoms of tick-borne illness, yet often face incomprehension or worse.

VANCOUVER – What if you picked up a crippling bacterial disease, but your doctor says it’s virtually impossible you have it? Or the doctor agrees you’re sick, but won’t treat you for fear of being drummed out of the profession?

Lyme disease patients in British Columbia say that’s what’s happening to them, and they’re being forced to look outside the mainstream medicalsystem for help.

While health officials say a few hundred Canadians contract Lyme disease each year, patient advocates claim that’s a drastic underestimate.

They say they’re given inadequate tests, denied medical treatment or told something else is causing the muscle and joint pain that leaves them unable to walk. And the few doctors willing to treat them with long-term antibiotics — sometimes administered for months intravenously — fear repercussions from their licensing bodies.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/health/People+with+Lyme+disease+they+treatment/3397141/story.html#ixzz0x4eRzKxU

Sept 20, 2009

Thousands of Canadians are sounding the alarm about a silent menace. It’s Lyme disease, an illness spread by bites from ticks. The consequences can be devastating – but as history has shown — many victims don’t even know they have the disease until it’s too late..

Watch video

Deer ticks may be spreading to a larger area of Bedford, N.S., than was previously thought, says MLA Kelly Regan.

The tick carries a parasite that can cause Lyme disease, a condition that has affected several residents who live near Admiral’s Cove Park.

Last week, a case of a deer tick, also known as a blacklegged tick, with Lyme disease was confirmed several kilometres away on Doyle Street and Regan is warning residents to take precautions.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/story/2010/08/17/ns-tick-problem-spreads.html#ixzz0wvU8VBjc

image from cbc

cbc wrote july 19:
Ticks carrying Lyme disease are on the move on the island of Newfoundland, lab tests have confirmed.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/newfoundland-labrador/story/2010/07/19/lyme-disease-ticks-whitney-719.html#ixzz0uEI5LTlQ

image from halifax.ca

Halifax.ca’s Invasive Species warnings:
The black legged tick has been positively identified in Admiral’s Cove Park in Bedford.

read more: http://www.halifax.ca/environment/InvasiveSpecies.html

bsichel of Media Corp wrote:
Nova Scotia has seen 48 cases of Lyme disease since its first reporting in 2002, according to the Department of Health Promotion and Protection. This month’s cases in Bedford prompted a controversial plan by city council to use a powerful pesticide in the park – a plan quickly nixed by the provincial NDP government as it came to light that the pesticide is not approved for use in Canada. Bedford councillor Tim Outhit and the Chronicle-Herald’s editorial team have both condemned the province’s decision.

Read More: http://halifax.mediacoop.ca/story/ticks-move-weather/3736