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VOICE OF THE PEOPLE

September 25, 2011 – 3:54am

Discredited test

It’s alarming to read that the person in charge of infectious disease control in Nova Scotia is asserting that doctors should be relying on blood tests for a diagnosis of Lyme disease (re: “Doctors blamed for mishandling Lyme disease,” Sept. 22).

The Public Health Agency of Canada quite clearly recommends: “When someone shows symptoms of Lyme disease and might have been exposed to the ticks that carry it … physicians [should] treat the illness, even if it has not been confirmed with laboratory testing.”

Furthermore, the ELISA test used here is notoriously unreliable, and at least one Lyme disease specialist has publicly urged that it be banned.

The number of Lyme cases officially recognized by the province (67) remains laughably small by comparison with the actual cases.

It’s high time that the Health Department records the number of people being treated, rather than the number of positive results on a discredited test.

Gillian Thomas, Ardoise

Deserve better

In your Sept. 22 article “Doctors blamed for mishandling Lyme disease,” Elaine Holmes, the province’s director of communicable disease prevention control, is reported as saying, “Nova Scotia uses blood tests to confirm Lyme disease” and “any clinical diagnoses in Nova Scotia must be followed up by a blood test.”

I draw to your attention an article in The Chronicle Herald in February, titled “Lyme disease tests gave false all-clear to 13 Nova Scotians — health officer.”

In this article, Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief public health officer, is quoted as saying, “Often our recommendation to physicans is if somebody has been in an area of high risk or has a likely or known tick bite and then also has clinical symptoms, to go ahead and … treat the person. And we’ll continue to call them a Lyme disease case and everything regardless of what the lab tests show.”

Elaine Holmes’ statements are in direct opposition to Dr. Strang’s.

Both of these individuals are employed by the Health Department of Nova Scotia. Does the right hand not know what the left hand is doing?

With the mishandling, underdiagnosis and misdiagnosis of Lyme disease in this province, it is not the health professionals who are suffering. It is the Lyme disease victims.

We deserve better.

Paula Isenor, Bedford

Seffernsville resident goes undiagnosed for two years

by Paula Levy

After two years of being ill, Shaelene Robar, Seffernsville, has been diagnosed with Lyme disease. The 15 year old's mother, Gail, has been advocating on her daughter's behalf.

It took two years for 15-year-old Shaelene Robar of Seffernsville to get a diagnosis and begin treatment for Lyme disease. The girl’s mother, Gail Robar, would not give up advocating for her daughter until she received answers and treatment.

 In December of 2008, Shaelene suddenly became ill. She and her family thought her illness was simply the flu. But the body aches and fever continued long after a normal flu illness would have cleared.

 ”The doctor kept saying that she would just be better, that it was a virus and it would just go away,” said Gail.

 But the symptoms would not go away and Shaelene began to become more and more ill. Over the coming months her fatigue, nausea, dizziness and now stomach pain intensified. Her mother took her to see doctors and specialists but no one could pinpoint the cause of Shaelene’s illness.

 Gail said during that time Shaelene was misdiagnosed with multiple sclerosis, chronic fatigue syndrome, Crohn’s disease, figbromyalagia and a mental illness. No treatments for these diseases helped and over the course of nearly two years, Shaelene kept getting sicker and sicker. She was also once thought to have anorexia because the teenager had lost over 30 pounds.

Shaelene said she had to drop out of school in Grade 8 because she was unable to cope with the extreme fatigue, dizziness and pain. This year she is supposed to be attending Grade 10 but she was only able to go to school for five days at the beginning of the year.

 ”I’m nauseous and I’m too weak to even move half the time,” said Shaelene.

 Gail said she realized that Shaelene had been bitten by ticks the summer before she became mysteriously ill. Her mother noted since the Robars do not live in an area that has the type of ticks – deer or blacklegged ticks – which are known to carry Lyme disease, at first Lyme didn’t seem possible. Gail said the ticks in their area are dog ticks, but now she is convinced that they too can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.

 The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains that blacklegged ticks are the only carriers that can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.

 Research scientist Dr. Robbin Lindsay said in Canada, the blacklegged tick and the western blacklegged tick are the types of ticks known to transmit Lyme disease to humans.

 ”While there have been several scientific research studies demonstrating that on rare occasions other types of ticks including the dog tick and insects like mosquitoes, fleas and certain biting flies can be infected with the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, they are not infectious and cannot transmit the bacteria to humans,” said Dr. Lindsay.

 Despite not having the well-known carriers of Lyme disease in her backyard, Shaelene was clearly ill. And Gail maintained that her daughter had contracted the disease. Her physician screened the young woman for Lyme disease. But that test proved negative. Lyme disease tests are first screened in Nova Scotia. Only those who screen positive are sent for further testing to the national lab in Winnipeg. Gail said the screening test is not reliable.

 ”The test is not reliable whatsoever. Those people that don’t test positive are out of luck,” she said.

The unreliability of the test is also maintained by Jim Wilson, president of the Canadian Lyme Disease Foundation.

 ”The present testing methods used were shown to be faulty,” said Mr. Wilson, quoting a January 2011 study. “It has been misdiagnosed as everything from multiple sclerosis, to chronic fatigue, Parkinsonism, irritable bowel syndrome, various forms of arthritis, psychiatric issues, heart conditions, and on and on. Canada just happens to have the highest rates in the world of these diagnoses but very little Lyme.” The foundation believes that Public Health is underestimating the burden of Lyme disease in Canada.

 Still convinced that Lyme disease was the culprit for her daughter’s illness, Gail continued to advocate on her daughter’s behalf. She took Shaelene to Port Hawkesbury to see a family physician who is known to treat patients suspected of having Lyme disease. He was contacted but did not return calls. However, through this physician, Gail paid $500 to have her daughter’s blood work sent to American laboratory IGene-X Inc.

 That test came back positive. But even though Shaelene has a positive diagnosis, it is not accepted in Canada because the laboratory is not a government-run lab.

 Gail said now that Shaelene finally has a diagnosis after two years, she is currently being treated with antibiotics by the physician in Port Hawkesbury. Shaelene said this course of antibiotics began in December and she has some improvement.

 ”I’ve been able to eat a lot more,” said Shaelene. But the teenager is still weak. Her mother expects it will take some time before Shaelene is able to return to a normal life.

 The Public Health Agency’s website states there are several antibiotics which can treat the illness but the sooner treatment starts, the better. In addition, it states that people with certain neurological or cardiac problems may require intravenous treatment and patients diagnosed in the later stages of the disease can have persistent or recurrent symptoms requiring a longer course of antibiotic treatment

The symptoms of Lyme disease usually happen in three stages. The first sign of infection is usually a circular rash which occurs in about 70 to 80 per cent of infected people. It begins at the site of the tick bite after a delay of three days to one month.

 Other common symptoms include

 * fatigue

 * chills

 * fever

 * headache

 * muscle and joint pain

 * swollen lymph nodes

 If untreated, the second stage of the disease can last up to several months and include

 * central and peripheral nervous system disorders

 * multiple skin rashes

 * arthritis and arthritic symptoms

 * heart palpitations

 * extreme fatigue and general weakness

If the disease remains untreated, the third stage can last months to years with symptoms that can include recurring arthritis and neurological problems.

 -The Public Health Agency of Canada

 

posted on 03/15/11

2500x VFRC vs. HR-dark field (HD 1080/50p) video microscopy of Borrelia sp

Published on Dec 4, 2012

Borrelia spirochete species can hardly be visualized in vital blood due to fast movement and halo effects of conventional dark field illumination. Here we show an improved VFRC (0:00-03:40) and HR (high time and image resolution) dark field (DF) illumination (04:00) using a special condensor with high intensity white LED and a VFRC 110x objective as well as 25-40x zoom lens focussed on a high resolution high sensitivity aps-c cmos chip. Large immune complexes of antibody-precipitated spirochetes, cyst forms of spirochetes, intracellular spirochetes and single vital fast moving spirochetes compromised by antibodies can well be seen in HR-DF, less in VFRC of the freshly isolated capillary blood. The patient is permanently treated by bioresonance, light therapy and herbal remedy therapy specific for neuroborreliosis, according to a novel protocol. Weekly DNA-PCR-tests are performed to screen the blood concentration of borrelia bacteria. The patient is suffering from skin release of spirochete cysts (histiocytomes and leucocytomes) as well as alzheimer-like psycho-neurological disorders. VFRC microscopy and HR-DF are a novel technique invented by Armin Koroknay, Switzerland

Up until 2011, there have been 120 cases of Lyme disease confirmed in the province

CBC News

Posted: Sep 5, 2012 7:04 AM AT

Last Updated: Sep 5, 2012 12:22 PM AT

Though numbers of ticks carrying Lyme disease in Nova Scotia haven’t been confirmed yet for 2012, one New Brunswick scientist warns that it could be on the rise.

Ticks were first spotted at Admiral’s Cove Park in Bedford in 2006.

It’s one of five areas in the province where Lyme disease and the ticks that carry it have been found.

Researchers at Mount Allison University said the number of ticks carrying the disease has jumped from 15 per cent to 40 per cent in New Brunswick.

Professor Vett Lloyd said numbers haven’t been confirmed in Nova Scotia, but it’s possible the results are similar.

“There are probably pockets where the frequency is 40 per cent, there may also be small regions where the frequency is higher,” Lloyd said.

Two years ago the province overruled a decision by city council to spray an insecticide all around Admiral’s Cove Park to try to control the spread of the tick.

Deer baiting stations may be the best defence against the spread of the disease.

As the deer bends its neck to eat corn, an insecticide is applied that’s supposed kill any tick on its body.

Stopping the spread

Andrew Hebda, an entomologist at the Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History, said he believes the increase isn’t as high as some scientists claim it to be, but there’s no stopping the spread.

see full story:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2012/09/04/ns-lyme-disease-nova-scotia.html