Lyme Disease Halifax

Lyme Disease – Information on Lyme Disease- Life stories of Lyme disease

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A tiny Lyme-bearing Pacific black-legged tick on a person's arm.

By Sean McIntyre – Gulf Islands Driftwood
Published: July 04, 2012 9:00 AM
Updated: July 04, 2012 10:07 AM
When Salt Spring’s Terri Bibby noticed a bite that developed a red rash after a hike in 2009, she never imagined that she would find herself becoming part of a major medical controversy, requiring years of expensive medical treatment and having to cope with the life-altering symptoms of Lyme disease.

As in the case of many other Canadians in her situation, Bibby was unable to receive a proper diagnosis because of the medical community’s ongoing discord about the disease’s prevalence, diagnosis and treatment. “There is no Lyme in B.C.,” she recalls being told at the Victoria hospital where she was taken by ambulance.

The introduction of a private member’s bill by Saanich-Gulf Islands MP Elizabeth May on June 21 has offered some hope that others faced with potential infection won’t have to undergo the same sense of isolation and frustration experienced by Bibby and countless others.

“This is the ultimate of non-partisan issues. This is the ultimate of non-geographically limited issues,” said the Green Party of Canada leader, while introducing Bill C-442 in the House of Commons. “We are, in each of our ridings, facing an increasing threat to our constituents and their families from a very tiny threat: a tiny tick that is spreading and spreading and can bring debilitating illness to any one of us at any time.”

Lyme disease is caused by a bacteria that is transmitted to humans by ticks, insects that can often be as small as a poppy seed.

May wants to implement a nationwide discussion and subsequent strategy to address the affects of Lyme disease. The proposal, she said, would serve to promote awareness, better diagnosis, offer treatments and examine best practices used in other parts of the world. If the bacteria isn’t detected and treated at the correct moment, the disease’s symptoms can include fever, severe headaches and joint pain, along with other cognitive and neurological debilitations.

“With climate change anticipated to change the number of vector-borne diseases like Lyme disease, development of a formal federal strategy will become a high priority.

“At a time when many U.S. states have tackled this urgent issue head on, it is ironic that Canada still downplays Lyme disease and clings to outdated standards for diagnosis and care,” reads part of a statement released in conjunction with May’s announcement.

“This means that every year hundreds, even thousands, of Canadians either go untreated or are required to go to the United States for treatment where they are prescribed heavy doses of antibiotics not covered by our provincial healthcare plans,” May said.

In Bibby’s case, several trips were made to Seattle and New York state to see specialists and undergo a definitive test that shows she still has Lyme disease after three years of various treatments.

This personal experience encouraged Bibby’s husband, an award-wining documentary filmmaker, to begin work on a film titled A New Lens on Lyme that looks at the latest research on Lyme and associated diseases that are transmitted by ticks.

“The film is science-based,” said Alan Bibby. “It will contain information about the debate in the medical community, but we want to go beyond the rhetoric. The biggest questions involve the reliability of tests, the safety and efficacy of antibiotic treatments and whether the disease-causing organisms can be permanently eliminated. We want to document success stories — those chronic Lyme patients that have achieved a quality of life: what worked for them? We would like something positive to come out of this.”

Bibby has taped local stories and interviewed “Lyme-literate” doctors, specialists and scientists in the United States, where reported cases of Lyme infections are between 20,000 and 30,000 individuals per year. Given that ticks can be found anywhere in the Gulf Islands and Vancouver Island, Bibby urges people who spend any amount of time outdoors to inspect themselves for possible bites on a regular basis.

Ticks are best removed by a slow and gentle pull with fingers or tweezers. Specialized tick removers are available through local retailers and people with any concerns can always visit Lady Minto Hospital.

The best way to lower the odds of contracting Lyme disease is through prevention. In addition to regular tick checks, the Vancouver Island Health Authority recommends people walk on cleared trails wherever possible, wear light coloured clothing, tuck shirts into pants and tuck pants into boots or socks, use a DEET-based insect repellant on all uncovered skin, inspect clothing and scalp when leaving tick-prone areas like grassy fields of forests, and regularly check household pets.

Should symptoms like a bull’s-eye rash develop around the bitten area, Bibby recommends people consult a physician and insist upon immediate antibiotic treatment. “Don’t wait for unreliable testing,” he said.

Bibby said anyone who wants to share their experience with Lyme disease is encouraged to reach him at 250-537-8813 or bibby@media-group.com.

Article Link here:
http://www.gulfislandsdriftwood.com/news/161347775.html

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November 28th, 2012
Dear Nova Scotia MLA/MP:
RE: Lyme Disease in Nova Scotia
Lyme Disease (LD) is an emerging disease in Nova Scotia and Canada that is generating considerable attention from the media, advocacy groups and communities. Given this situation, I felt it important that you had accurate and up-to-date information on LD in Nova Scotia and the provincial response plan.
LD is a bacterial illness that can be transmitted to humans through the bite of a blacklegged tick (deer tick). There are a number of tick species in Nova Scotia, but only the blacklegged tick can carry the bacteria that can cause LD. Not all blacklegged ticks carry the bacteria and the risk of acquiring LD remains low in the province. LD is readily treatable with appropriate antibiotics.
The Department of Health and Wellness (DHW) has an active LD response plan which includes an interdisciplinary committee (public health, veterinary medicine, wildlife biology) that provides evidence-based advice and guidance to the provincial government on the control of LD. Nova Scotia has multiple infectious disease and medical microbiologist experts in the province who deal with treatment and diagnosis of LD. DHW has a close working relationship with these clinical experts through an Infectious Disease Expert Group, which meets regularly to advise DHW on public health and infection control issues. We also work closely with our partners at the Public Health Agency of Canada and the National Microbiology Laboratory who provide evidence based recommendations for the prevention and surveillance of LD and ticks.
Tick and Lyme Disease Surveillance
Lyme disease is a notifiable disease under the National Microbiology Laboratory. Health care professionals are required to report cases of Lyme disease to Public Health when they diagnose clients clinically or with laboratory confirmation. In 2011, there were 54 confirmed cases of LD reported to Public Health, corresponding to an incidence rate of 5.8 cases per 100,000 population. Surveillance of both human cases and blacklegged ticks in the province enables DHW to keep abreast of the current state of Lyme disease in Nova Scotia.
Over the past few years, DHW together with the Department of Natural Resources and the Public Health Agency of Canada have been identifying and testing ticks collected in Nova Scotia. Analysis of this data has identified six areas where blacklegged ticks carrying the bacteria that can cause LD are known to be endemic (i.e. have become established as part of the local ecology). These endemic locations are areas in Yarmouth County, Shelburne County, Lunenburg County, Halifax County, Pictou County and most recently Queens County. These known endemic areas can be found on the Department of Health and Wellness website at http://www.gov.ns.ca/hpp/cdpc/lyme.asp
DHW has had a tick surveillance program in place since 2002, which included both passive (ticks being submitted by the public) and active plans. In the fall of 2011, DHW restructured its tick surveillance program to place an emphasis on active surveillance. Active surveillance involves ‘in the field’ work including small mammal testing and dragging vegetation to collect
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ticks. We will continue with focused active surveillance to determine additional areas where ticks may be establishing.
It is expected the number of LD cases will increase over time as ticks become more densely populated and expand their geographical range when conditions permit. Climate change related to global warming is expected to contribute to the increase of LD in Nova Scotia and Canada.
Public Information
DHW regularly provides consistent, evidence based information about LD and its prevention to the public. Strategies are implemented each year to provide Nova Scotians with information about the prevention of tick bites and to ensure health care providers have the most up to date clinical information. The DHW website is regularly updated plus we work closely with partners to disseminate information regarding LD to the public and stakeholders via various methods (letters via schools, residential letters, media releases, websites, signs in parks/campgrounds). DHW has also provided an advertorial for newspapers as well as news release each year. DHW regularly responds to multiple media requests and letters to government regarding LD.
Nova Scotians and visitors to the province can help prevent exposure to blacklegged ticks and LD by taking some simple precautions. This is especially important when in areas where there may be increased risk. Prevention messages can be found on the DHW website at: http://www.gov.ns.ca/hpp/cdpc/lyme.asp
Information to Clinicians
Webinars have been provided to health care providers in the last few years, addressing prevention, surveillance, diagnosis and treatment of LD. In addition, the DHW provides updates to physicians in the province via Doctors Nova Scotia. The Infectious Disease Expert Group has developed a document entitled “Statement for Managing Lyme Disease in Nova Scotia” which has been widely circulated to physicians in the province. This document is based on current evidence and follows the guidelines endorsed by the Infectious Disease Society of America.
Testing
Laboratory testing for LD in Nova Scotia follows the guidelines established by the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. These guidelines have been endorsed by the Canadian Public Health Laboratories Network and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
We are aware of the Canadian Lyme disease advocacy group, Can Lyme, who claim that the testing and treatment of LD is inadequate. However, the testing methods they promote, and the ones used by many private labs in the US, are not endorsed by infectious disease and laboratory experts.
Research
DHW supports and partners with many researchers in the field of LD and tick surveillance. Research that DHW is aware of and supports includes the Public Health Agency of Canada’s study on identification of emerging endemic areas for the blacklegged tick and prediction of the further spread of LD. Two other research initiatives that DHW supports include the human seroprevalence study on LD and the Deer Treatment Study. We are aware that other
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researchers initiate studies within the province with or without consultation or consideration of experts on the interdisciplinary committee.
If you have additional questions regarding LD, or if you would like to involve a regional Medical Officer of Health in any meetings with community or advocacy groups, please contact your local Public Health office which can be found through the following website: http://novascotia.ca/DHW/about/phs-offices.asp
We appreciate your ongoing support and cooperation to help ensure Nova Scotians receive evidence-based information on LD.
Sincerely,
Robert Strang MD, MHSc., FRCPC
Chief Medical Officer of Health
c. Dr. Frank Atherton – Deputy Chief Medical Officer of Health, Health and Wellness
Elaine Holmes, Director – Communicable Disease Prevention and Control, Health and Wellness
Regional Medical Officers of Health

Protester Janet Conners in Ottawa accuses the government and Canadian blood supply managers of silence and coverups during the tainted blood scandal of the 1970s and '80s. The woman's husband died from AIDS contracted from a blood transfusion. (Andrew Wallace/Canadian Press)

Canada’s blood supply
10 years after Krever, is it safe?
Last Updated April 27, 2007
CBC News

Blood is probably the most precious liquid on Earth. It nourishes and restores life and is shared widely within communities, countries and around the world.

Bad or tainted blood is a human disaster on a similarly vast scale, as scandals in Canada, France, Australia and Britain have shown. A decade ago, this country finally began to come to terms with the criminal tragedy of blood infected with HIV and hepatitis C, and the thousands upon thousands of innocent Canadians who contracted the diseases through blood transfusions.

In November 1997, a royal commission headed by Justice Horace Krever of the Ontario Court of Appeal roundly vilified governments and blood collection agencies for their roles in that dark episode. Criminal charges were laid and the country belatedly took extensive steps to protect the blood supply.

Independent public agencies were set up to collect and protect blood donations in Quebec and the rest of Canada. Extensive testing was introduced at every stage of the process. Politicians and victims of the scandal squared off across a minefield of compensation and liability issues, and slowly but surely the crucial central issue of ensuring a safe blood supply began.

So where do we stand now? Is Canada’s blood supply safe? Is it being adequately protected from existing threats and those that might come along in future? And will we have enough blood to serve an aging population when demographics show that most blood donors are themselves aging, with younger people yet to pick up the demographic slack?

See full Article:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/health/blood-supply.html

2500x VFRC vs. HR-dark field (HD 1080/50p) video microscopy of Borrelia sp

Published on Dec 4, 2012

Borrelia spirochete species can hardly be visualized in vital blood due to fast movement and halo effects of conventional dark field illumination. Here we show an improved VFRC (0:00-03:40) and HR (high time and image resolution) dark field (DF) illumination (04:00) using a special condensor with high intensity white LED and a VFRC 110x objective as well as 25-40x zoom lens focussed on a high resolution high sensitivity aps-c cmos chip. Large immune complexes of antibody-precipitated spirochetes, cyst forms of spirochetes, intracellular spirochetes and single vital fast moving spirochetes compromised by antibodies can well be seen in HR-DF, less in VFRC of the freshly isolated capillary blood. The patient is permanently treated by bioresonance, light therapy and herbal remedy therapy specific for neuroborreliosis, according to a novel protocol. Weekly DNA-PCR-tests are performed to screen the blood concentration of borrelia bacteria. The patient is suffering from skin release of spirochete cysts (histiocytomes and leucocytomes) as well as alzheimer-like psycho-neurological disorders. VFRC microscopy and HR-DF are a novel technique invented by Armin Koroknay, Switzerland