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Recent press release from CDC who’s motto is “24/7  saving lives and protecting people” !!

http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2013/p0819-lyme-disease.html

…and it’s getting considerable attention…

http://lymedisease.org/news/touchedbylyme/cdc-lyme-number-coverage.html

TOUCHED BY LYME: “300,000? number catches media’s eye

21st August 2013
When the CDC bumped its estimate of annual Lyme cases from 30,000 to ten times that, it made the evening news.

I blogged last week about the unprecedented wave of recent media coverage about Lyme disease. Turns out, we hadn’t seen nothin’ yet.

On Monday, August 19, the CDC announced that it had raised its official estimate of how many cases of Lyme disease are diagnosed each year, from 30,000 to 300,000.  (No matter that way back in 2004, the CDC stated on the record that official numbers were likely underreported by a factor of 10. Suddenly, putting that big number—300,000—in an official government press release made the news media sit up and take notice.)

All the major news outlets carried the story, some of them going into deeper detail than others. Here are links to a sampling if you want to check them out yourself.

Boston Globe

Poughkeepsie Journal

PBS Newshour

NBC Virginia

CBS Chicago

San Francisco-area TV station KTVU

The New Yorker blog

In addition to a news story, the Poughkeepsie Journal (in New York state) ran an editorial entitled “Lyme fight must go beyond change in numbers.” In addition to having more accurate reporting of cases, the newspaper suggests a number of changes:

That would include providing doctors with more protections if they are treating long-term cases of Lyme. It also would include establishing a federal advisory committee to ensure that all medical points of view are being represented before public health policy decisions are reached in relation to Lyme.

Sound proposals have been offered for years, but little action has been taken. Armed with new numbers, advocates must continue the fight for a better and broader fight against Lyme.

Hear, hear.

TOUCHED BY LYME is written by Dorothy Kupcha Leland, LymeDisease.org’s VP for Education and Outreach. Contact her at dleland@lymedisease.org.

- See more at: http://lymedisease.org/news/touchedbylyme/cdc-lyme-number-coverage.html#sthash.VBV9I5Gl.dpuf

Lyme disease specialist pleads for more medical awareness
Posted on May 22, 2013 Steve Goodwin

Chelsey Livingstone-Rector, left, and her mother Angela discuss Lyme disease with Dr. Ernie Murakami at a presentation on Lyme last week. (Goodwin photo

People need to rally so that the medical community hears their calls for a serious discussion and treatment of Lyme disease, Dr. Ernie Murakami says.
The retired medical doctor from Hope, B.C., who has gained a rising profile in his quest to educate people and doctors about the disease, says it’s the only way – short of legal action – that will turn the discussion to benefit those who suffer from the debilitating disease.
“The bigger the body, the better the response,” he told about 150 people who attended his address last Wednesday at the Pictou County Wellness Centre. “You can’t do it alone. There’s power in numbers. We as Canadians have to say, ‘Enough of this crap.’”
Many doctors throughout Canada who want to treat Lyme patients are refusing to, over the risk of having their medical licences pulled by various provincial bodies like the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia, Murakami said.
Now 82, Murakami is among many who gave up their practices to avoid harassment and persecution by authorities.
“A lot of doctors want to treat, but they’re afraid to treat because of our colleges,” he said. “This is Canada. There is a constant fear factor. They do not want to lose their licences, so don’t blame the doctors directly. (The colleges) have the power, the intimidation. It’s up to you. It’s your tax dollars.”
Murakami has been treating Lyme patients for years and recognizes how global warming is allowing the ticks that carry the bacteria that cause the disease to proliferate around the world, especially in temperature climates between the 20th and 70th northern latitudes.
He argues with any medical authorities who defend faulty lab testing.
“You only need a clinical diagnosis,” he said. “Doctors are at times viciously denying there is a problem.”
Among those who attended were Angela Livingstone-Rector, who has raised nearly $5,000 for initial and ongoing treatment so her daughter, Chelsey, can see a Lyme doctor who lives in Montreal but practices in update New York because she’s prohibited from treating Lyme patients in Canada.
Chelsey has symptoms consistent with Lyme disease, has no energy to attend school and sleeps a lot, Angela said.
“I had to get her out of bed to come here,” she said. “We’ve been told it isn’t Lyme disease, that it’s all in her head.”

See full story:

http://www.pictouadvocate.com/2013/05/22/lyme-disease-specialist-pleads-for-more-medical-awareness/

The Lyme doctor

By Joanne Laucius, OTTAWA CITIZEN May 9, 2013

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/health/Lyme+doctor/8363919/story.html#ixzz2Tb0Tiw9w

Dr. Ernie Murakami says denying chronic Lyme is ‘a big, major lie.’ Photograph by: Jenelle Schneider , Vancouver Sun

Dr. Ernie Murakami says he treated 3,000 patients for Lyme disease before he was forced into retirement.

The B.C. physician can no longer prescribe the long-term antibiotics he believes are necessary to treat chronic Lyme. But retirement hasn’t stopped him for directing people to physicians in the U.S. and Europe who diagnose and treat Lyme disease.

By his own count. Murakami has offered free advice to more than 7,000 people looking for help. He will be in Ottawa May 13 for a speaking engagement.

Murakami was the subject of a College of Physicians and Surgeons of B.C. investigation that began in 2005 and agreed to retire in 2008. He says his story has frightened physicians from treating chronic Lyme with long-term antibiotics.

In the world of conventional medicine, few agree that chronic Lyme exists. They maintain that Lyme is a convenient explanation for chronic fatigue and mysterious pain that is hard to diagnose, backed up by conspiracy theories and an increasingly powerful Lyme advocacy lobby.

In September 2011, the influential medial journal The Lancet published an essay authored by 13 medical experts from institutions like Harvard Medical School and Yale University who argued that people searching for information on the Internet see the websites of Lyme advocates and doctors as reliable sources, drawing attention away from evidence-based medicine.

Long-term antibiotic treatment is profitable for “Lyme-literate” doctors, they wrote. And it can be falsely reassuring to patients to believe they have a chronic infection so they don’t seek diagnosis and treatment for something else.

But Murakami says denying chronic Lyme is “a big, major lie.”

And he’s not backing down.

Murakami says diagnosing Lyme is a matter of a clinical diagnosis — that is, observations and reports from the patient about the symptoms, not just lab tests.

“I wouldn’t have wasted the past five years without some credibility,” says Murakami, who had studied bacteriology and immunology and got interested in Lyme when he treated a patient, a student who had been planting trees, in his practice in Hope B.C., about 160 kilometres east of Vancouver.

He had studied syphilis and says Lyme is similar in that it is also caused by a spiral bacteria called a spirochete.

According to Murakami, there are a couple of problems in the system: First, many people who are bitten by an infected tick don’t notice it and only go to see a doctor if they develop the telltale bull’s-eye rash. He says fewer than half of those who go on to develop Lyme actually get the rash.

Secondly, the approved test for diagnosing Lyme is the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, known as the ELISA test. This is a two-step process. Only those who test positive in the first part of the test go on to the second part of the test, known as the Western blot test.

Murakami says the ELISA test often produces false negatives so many people who have Lyme are not being diagnosed — and those who are diagnosed get only a 30-day course of treatment as recommended by the guidelines.

He maintains that months and even years of antibiotic treatment are often necessary to kill all the pathogens. Conventional medicine frowns on long-term antibiotics to treat Lyme — although this is sometimes done for decades at a time to treat acne, according to Murakami.

The other issue is that the magnitude of the problem is hidden because people are not getting diagnosed, he says.

Lyme diagnoses are much higher in Washington state just across the border from B.C., while multiple sclerosis diagnoses are much higher in B.C. Murakami believes some people are being mistakenly and unnecessarily treated for MS when chronic Lyme disease is behind the symptoms.

There is also a big differences on both sides of the border in terms of the proportion of ticks carrying the infection, with officials in states bordering Canada claiming a higher rate of infection for their ticks than neighbouring Canadian jurisdictions, says Murakami, who is skeptical that American ticks are more likely to be infected than their Canadian counterparts.

B.C.’s health ministry has extended the right to prescribe antibiotics to naturopaths and some patients are turning to this option, says Murakami. Ontario naturopaths can’t prescribe antibiotics, and there is currently no indication this is likely to happen in the foreseeable future, according to the College of Naturopaths of Ontario.

Murakami says he knows of five people who have committed suicide because they are overwhelmed and depressed by chronic Lyme.

“The medical world has a big divide. We owe it to the public to sit down and talk.”

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/health/Lyme+doctor/8363919/story.html#ixzz2Tb1FxVCq

Our Nova Scotian girl and her mother both have Lyme disease and need help. If you are in a position to assist in any way it would be enormously appreciated. Please and heartfelt Thank-you’s in advance.

My daughter and I have been diagnosed with Chronic Lyme Disease. She is 12 and has it since she was two and a half. I was just recently diagnosed and have had it for almost 17 years without knowing. We are fighting our government to have this terrible disease reconized, and treated in Canada. I am unable to work now and have no income coming in and treatment is hard. We are surviving on my husbands pension. Anyone wishing to help in this fight against Lyme is welcome to do so. Thank you in advance.

Seffernsville resident goes undiagnosed for two years

by Paula Levy

After two years of being ill, Shaelene Robar, Seffernsville, has been diagnosed with Lyme disease. The 15 year old's mother, Gail, has been advocating on her daughter's behalf.

It took two years for 15-year-old Shaelene Robar of Seffernsville to get a diagnosis and begin treatment for Lyme disease. The girl’s mother, Gail Robar, would not give up advocating for her daughter until she received answers and treatment.

 In December of 2008, Shaelene suddenly became ill. She and her family thought her illness was simply the flu. But the body aches and fever continued long after a normal flu illness would have cleared.

 ”The doctor kept saying that she would just be better, that it was a virus and it would just go away,” said Gail.

 But the symptoms would not go away and Shaelene began to become more and more ill. Over the coming months her fatigue, nausea, dizziness and now stomach pain intensified. Her mother took her to see doctors and specialists but no one could pinpoint the cause of Shaelene’s illness.

 Gail said during that time Shaelene was misdiagnosed with multiple sclerosis, chronic fatigue syndrome, Crohn’s disease, figbromyalagia and a mental illness. No treatments for these diseases helped and over the course of nearly two years, Shaelene kept getting sicker and sicker. She was also once thought to have anorexia because the teenager had lost over 30 pounds.

Shaelene said she had to drop out of school in Grade 8 because she was unable to cope with the extreme fatigue, dizziness and pain. This year she is supposed to be attending Grade 10 but she was only able to go to school for five days at the beginning of the year.

 ”I’m nauseous and I’m too weak to even move half the time,” said Shaelene.

 Gail said she realized that Shaelene had been bitten by ticks the summer before she became mysteriously ill. Her mother noted since the Robars do not live in an area that has the type of ticks – deer or blacklegged ticks – which are known to carry Lyme disease, at first Lyme didn’t seem possible. Gail said the ticks in their area are dog ticks, but now she is convinced that they too can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.

 The Public Health Agency of Canada maintains that blacklegged ticks are the only carriers that can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.

 Research scientist Dr. Robbin Lindsay said in Canada, the blacklegged tick and the western blacklegged tick are the types of ticks known to transmit Lyme disease to humans.

 ”While there have been several scientific research studies demonstrating that on rare occasions other types of ticks including the dog tick and insects like mosquitoes, fleas and certain biting flies can be infected with the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, they are not infectious and cannot transmit the bacteria to humans,” said Dr. Lindsay.

 Despite not having the well-known carriers of Lyme disease in her backyard, Shaelene was clearly ill. And Gail maintained that her daughter had contracted the disease. Her physician screened the young woman for Lyme disease. But that test proved negative. Lyme disease tests are first screened in Nova Scotia. Only those who screen positive are sent for further testing to the national lab in Winnipeg. Gail said the screening test is not reliable.

 ”The test is not reliable whatsoever. Those people that don’t test positive are out of luck,” she said.

The unreliability of the test is also maintained by Jim Wilson, president of the Canadian Lyme Disease Foundation.

 ”The present testing methods used were shown to be faulty,” said Mr. Wilson, quoting a January 2011 study. “It has been misdiagnosed as everything from multiple sclerosis, to chronic fatigue, Parkinsonism, irritable bowel syndrome, various forms of arthritis, psychiatric issues, heart conditions, and on and on. Canada just happens to have the highest rates in the world of these diagnoses but very little Lyme.” The foundation believes that Public Health is underestimating the burden of Lyme disease in Canada.

 Still convinced that Lyme disease was the culprit for her daughter’s illness, Gail continued to advocate on her daughter’s behalf. She took Shaelene to Port Hawkesbury to see a family physician who is known to treat patients suspected of having Lyme disease. He was contacted but did not return calls. However, through this physician, Gail paid $500 to have her daughter’s blood work sent to American laboratory IGene-X Inc.

 That test came back positive. But even though Shaelene has a positive diagnosis, it is not accepted in Canada because the laboratory is not a government-run lab.

 Gail said now that Shaelene finally has a diagnosis after two years, she is currently being treated with antibiotics by the physician in Port Hawkesbury. Shaelene said this course of antibiotics began in December and she has some improvement.

 ”I’ve been able to eat a lot more,” said Shaelene. But the teenager is still weak. Her mother expects it will take some time before Shaelene is able to return to a normal life.

 The Public Health Agency’s website states there are several antibiotics which can treat the illness but the sooner treatment starts, the better. In addition, it states that people with certain neurological or cardiac problems may require intravenous treatment and patients diagnosed in the later stages of the disease can have persistent or recurrent symptoms requiring a longer course of antibiotic treatment

The symptoms of Lyme disease usually happen in three stages. The first sign of infection is usually a circular rash which occurs in about 70 to 80 per cent of infected people. It begins at the site of the tick bite after a delay of three days to one month.

 Other common symptoms include

 * fatigue

 * chills

 * fever

 * headache

 * muscle and joint pain

 * swollen lymph nodes

 If untreated, the second stage of the disease can last up to several months and include

 * central and peripheral nervous system disorders

 * multiple skin rashes

 * arthritis and arthritic symptoms

 * heart palpitations

 * extreme fatigue and general weakness

If the disease remains untreated, the third stage can last months to years with symptoms that can include recurring arthritis and neurological problems.

 -The Public Health Agency of Canada

 

posted on 03/15/11

First study on birds as hosts of Lyme Disease

09.01.2013

Researchers at the University of Coimbra in Portugal lead the first study on the role of birds as reservoir hosts of the bacterium that causes Lyme borreliosis. The blackbird is a major reservoir host of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., responsible for Lyme disease – a disease that, if not treated at an early stage, causes severe lesions in the neurological, dermatological and articular systems.

This is the main conclusion of the first study in Portugal focused on the role of birds as agents for spread of infectious disease and as a reservoir of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., which is maintained in nature by various groups of vertebrates, including birds and some species of mammals and reptiles. This bacterium is transmitted by ticks, especially Ixodes ricinus.

Funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT), the study was developed over the past three years by a team of five researchers from the University of Coimbra, Center for the Study of Infectious Disease Vectors and the Dr. Ricardo Jorge National Institute of Health and the University of Neuchâtel (Switzerland).

Lyme disease, whose incidence is particularly high in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, was discovered for the first time in Portugal in 1989, and the first case was diagnosed in the region of Évora. Since then, about 35 new cases occur annually.

Although the incidence of disease is low in Portugal, “it is important to be informed about the risk of transmission of this disease and how to prevent it because the diagnosis is difficult due to the fact that early symptoms are similar to other diseases. This research provides valuable information to define the areas of risk and factors that influence the emergence of diseases transmitted by ticks and possibly prevent disease outbreaks”, states Cláudia Norte, coordinator of the study, which has already been published in international journals Environmental Microbiology and Experimental Applied Acarology.

Moreover, the researcher continues, “More and more people travel to other countries, including in areas where prevalence is high. Information is essential to take proper care”. “Thus”, she advises, “The use of light-colored clothes for a walk in the countryside or in the woods, where there are ticks normally, and looking to see if any tick is lodged in the body are a good idea. If so, remove it as soon as possible because the bacterium takes a few hours to pass effectively to a human. After the bite, if the disease is not properly treated with antibiotics at an early stage, bacteria can spread throughout the body and cause serious injury at neurological, cardiac and articular levels”.

The study also allowed the identification of a new strain of bacterium in Portugal – B. turdi – comprised by the capture of birds abundant in Portugal (about 20 species) for collecting blood samples and other tissues and ticks which were parasites on these birds. These samples have been evaluated at the molecular level to verify that  they were infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi s.l.

Plants were harvested at Tapada de Mafra and Mata do Choupal, monthly, for one year to assess seasonal variations in the abundance, distribution and infestation of ticks. With this approach, the researchers obtained information on what types of birds contribute most to the maintenance of different species of ticks and of course to the pathogens that may be carried.

See Article here:

http://english.pravda.ru/science/tech/09-01-2013/123426-study_birds-0/

A tiny Lyme-bearing Pacific black-legged tick on a person's arm.

By Sean McIntyre – Gulf Islands Driftwood
Published: July 04, 2012 9:00 AM
Updated: July 04, 2012 10:07 AM
When Salt Spring’s Terri Bibby noticed a bite that developed a red rash after a hike in 2009, she never imagined that she would find herself becoming part of a major medical controversy, requiring years of expensive medical treatment and having to cope with the life-altering symptoms of Lyme disease.

As in the case of many other Canadians in her situation, Bibby was unable to receive a proper diagnosis because of the medical community’s ongoing discord about the disease’s prevalence, diagnosis and treatment. “There is no Lyme in B.C.,” she recalls being told at the Victoria hospital where she was taken by ambulance.

The introduction of a private member’s bill by Saanich-Gulf Islands MP Elizabeth May on June 21 has offered some hope that others faced with potential infection won’t have to undergo the same sense of isolation and frustration experienced by Bibby and countless others.

“This is the ultimate of non-partisan issues. This is the ultimate of non-geographically limited issues,” said the Green Party of Canada leader, while introducing Bill C-442 in the House of Commons. “We are, in each of our ridings, facing an increasing threat to our constituents and their families from a very tiny threat: a tiny tick that is spreading and spreading and can bring debilitating illness to any one of us at any time.”

Lyme disease is caused by a bacteria that is transmitted to humans by ticks, insects that can often be as small as a poppy seed.

May wants to implement a nationwide discussion and subsequent strategy to address the affects of Lyme disease. The proposal, she said, would serve to promote awareness, better diagnosis, offer treatments and examine best practices used in other parts of the world. If the bacteria isn’t detected and treated at the correct moment, the disease’s symptoms can include fever, severe headaches and joint pain, along with other cognitive and neurological debilitations.

“With climate change anticipated to change the number of vector-borne diseases like Lyme disease, development of a formal federal strategy will become a high priority.

“At a time when many U.S. states have tackled this urgent issue head on, it is ironic that Canada still downplays Lyme disease and clings to outdated standards for diagnosis and care,” reads part of a statement released in conjunction with May’s announcement.

“This means that every year hundreds, even thousands, of Canadians either go untreated or are required to go to the United States for treatment where they are prescribed heavy doses of antibiotics not covered by our provincial healthcare plans,” May said.

In Bibby’s case, several trips were made to Seattle and New York state to see specialists and undergo a definitive test that shows she still has Lyme disease after three years of various treatments.

This personal experience encouraged Bibby’s husband, an award-wining documentary filmmaker, to begin work on a film titled A New Lens on Lyme that looks at the latest research on Lyme and associated diseases that are transmitted by ticks.

“The film is science-based,” said Alan Bibby. “It will contain information about the debate in the medical community, but we want to go beyond the rhetoric. The biggest questions involve the reliability of tests, the safety and efficacy of antibiotic treatments and whether the disease-causing organisms can be permanently eliminated. We want to document success stories — those chronic Lyme patients that have achieved a quality of life: what worked for them? We would like something positive to come out of this.”

Bibby has taped local stories and interviewed “Lyme-literate” doctors, specialists and scientists in the United States, where reported cases of Lyme infections are between 20,000 and 30,000 individuals per year. Given that ticks can be found anywhere in the Gulf Islands and Vancouver Island, Bibby urges people who spend any amount of time outdoors to inspect themselves for possible bites on a regular basis.

Ticks are best removed by a slow and gentle pull with fingers or tweezers. Specialized tick removers are available through local retailers and people with any concerns can always visit Lady Minto Hospital.

The best way to lower the odds of contracting Lyme disease is through prevention. In addition to regular tick checks, the Vancouver Island Health Authority recommends people walk on cleared trails wherever possible, wear light coloured clothing, tuck shirts into pants and tuck pants into boots or socks, use a DEET-based insect repellant on all uncovered skin, inspect clothing and scalp when leaving tick-prone areas like grassy fields of forests, and regularly check household pets.

Should symptoms like a bull’s-eye rash develop around the bitten area, Bibby recommends people consult a physician and insist upon immediate antibiotic treatment. “Don’t wait for unreliable testing,” he said.

Bibby said anyone who wants to share their experience with Lyme disease is encouraged to reach him at 250-537-8813 or bibby@media-group.com.

Article Link here:
http://www.gulfislandsdriftwood.com/news/161347775.html

Protester Janet Conners in Ottawa accuses the government and Canadian blood supply managers of silence and coverups during the tainted blood scandal of the 1970s and '80s. The woman's husband died from AIDS contracted from a blood transfusion. (Andrew Wallace/Canadian Press)

Canada’s blood supply
10 years after Krever, is it safe?
Last Updated April 27, 2007
CBC News

Blood is probably the most precious liquid on Earth. It nourishes and restores life and is shared widely within communities, countries and around the world.

Bad or tainted blood is a human disaster on a similarly vast scale, as scandals in Canada, France, Australia and Britain have shown. A decade ago, this country finally began to come to terms with the criminal tragedy of blood infected with HIV and hepatitis C, and the thousands upon thousands of innocent Canadians who contracted the diseases through blood transfusions.

In November 1997, a royal commission headed by Justice Horace Krever of the Ontario Court of Appeal roundly vilified governments and blood collection agencies for their roles in that dark episode. Criminal charges were laid and the country belatedly took extensive steps to protect the blood supply.

Independent public agencies were set up to collect and protect blood donations in Quebec and the rest of Canada. Extensive testing was introduced at every stage of the process. Politicians and victims of the scandal squared off across a minefield of compensation and liability issues, and slowly but surely the crucial central issue of ensuring a safe blood supply began.

So where do we stand now? Is Canada’s blood supply safe? Is it being adequately protected from existing threats and those that might come along in future? And will we have enough blood to serve an aging population when demographics show that most blood donors are themselves aging, with younger people yet to pick up the demographic slack?

See full Article:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/health/blood-supply.html

http://youtu.be/DpH_410Ghdk

Tell your friends about this !!!

Help bring Lyme research to new levels.

With today’s technology and knowledge we are lightyears ahead of just one decade ago. It is time for aggressive human tissue/fluid study, both live subject and post mortem.

No longer should we simply throw away tissues in any surgery people with and many other conditions. We want to thoroughly explore just how prevalent borreliosis is in the human population and we can do it now.
Register (very easy) and vote each day now until Dec. 12 to get us to the finals!!

See full story here:

Well over 1 million Canadians suffer from chronic illnesses such as myalgic encephalomyelitis (also known as chronic fatigue syndrome), fibromyalgia, multiple chemical sensitivities and Lyme disease. Currently these diseases do not get the required attention by our health care system. Moreover, research in these fields lacks greatly.

A new Complex Chronic Diseases Clinic will open in 2013 in Vancouver to address these diseases, research them and provide the support that its sufferers deserve.

Through this project, we want to help fund medical equipment needed in order to properly diagnose these patients, and acquire essential equipment in order to conduct proper research.

Here is the equipment that is currently most needed, identified by the administrators of this clinic:

Ongoing research in the future
-minus 80 degree Celsius upright freezer to store future patient samples for ongoing research in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme disease and Fibromyalgia
-refrigerated centrifuge to spin down the samples
-software system to track the patient samples and a label producing machine to track the samples in the freezer.

 No one is immune to these diseases in Canada. They happen to men, women and children. Moreover, many of the current patients are disabled, housebound and bedridden. This clinic in Vancouver represent hope for a better future.

— Will Carry Out Clinical Trials with Blood Systems Research Institute, Creative Testing Solutions —

BOSTON, MA — September 10, 2012 — Immunetics, Inc., has received a $3.7 million, two year SBIR contract from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, an agency of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to support clinical trials of a new blood screening test for Babesia infection.

“Babesia is among the top infectious threats to blood safety and, at present, there is no licensed test available. The NIH contract will allow us to address this gap in blood safety with the first cost-effective test designed for high-throughput screening of the blood supply.  We are honored to have been entrusted by NIH to carry out this public health mission,” said Andrew E. Levin, Ph.D., Immunetics Chief Executive Officer and Scientific Director.

Babesia is a parasite which is transmitted by the same ticks that transmit Lyme disease. While it is often asymptomatic in healthy people, Babesia infection can lead to severe or fatal illness, especially in immunocompromised patients. The parasites can remain viable in blood donations and infect transfusion recipients. In recent years, nine fatal cases of transfusion-transmitted babesiosis have been reported. Surveillance carried out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed over 1,000 cases of infection nationwide in 2011 — a number that appears to be growing. The US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) sponsored a workshop in 2008 focused on Babesiosis as an emerging threat to the blood supply, and the Blood Products Advisory Committee convened a meeting in 2010 to advise the FDA on approaches to blood screening for Babesia.

The contract award will enable Immunetics to bring its Babesia test, developed under initial NIH support, through clinical trials and regulatory licensure. The trials will be carried out in collaboration with Blood Systems Research Institute of San Francisco, Calif., and Creative Testing Solutions of Tempe, Ariz. Creative Testing Solutions currently tests about 25% of the US blood supply, including regions endemic for the parasitic agent. The Babesia test will initially be made available through Creative Testing Solutions’ laboratories.

“We look forward to partnering with Immunetics and BSRI in the development and FDA approval process of a Babesia assay for use in blood screening,” said Creative Testing Solutions President Sally Caglioti. “It is always our intent to offer innovative services that provide our customers with the best donor testing possible. Active collaboration in the development of diagnostic tests that fit the immediate needs of the blood banking community is the next logical step to support CTS’ mission.”

“When the screening test identifies antibody-reactive donors, we will enroll and conduct rigorous testing of donation-derived and follow-up samples from those donors so that we can more fully understand the natural history of Babesia infection in asymptomatic donors,” said Michael P. Busch, M.D., Ph.D., Blood Systems Research Institute Director and Senior Vice President for Research and Scientific Affairs at Blood Systems. “The information that we derive will help guide the development of policies on how the test can be used most effectively. It will also determine whether and how donors who have had a positive result on the screening test could safely donate in the future.”

For more information, visit the company’s website at http://www.immunetics.com or call 1-617-896-9100 or toll-free 1-800-227-4765.

Immunetics is a leading developer and provider of innovative tests for a variety of bacterial, viral, and parasitic diseases. Recently, the company received FDA clearance for its BacTx® test for bacterial contamination in platelets. The company has developed and markets other FDA-cleared products, including a test for Lyme disease, and is actively working on new tests for HIV and Chagas disease — both of which are known or emerging risks to the blood supply.

See full Article:

http://www.immunetics.com/pr_120910.html

Up until 2011, there have been 120 cases of Lyme disease confirmed in the province

CBC News

Posted: Sep 5, 2012 7:04 AM AT

Last Updated: Sep 5, 2012 12:22 PM AT

Though numbers of ticks carrying Lyme disease in Nova Scotia haven’t been confirmed yet for 2012, one New Brunswick scientist warns that it could be on the rise.

Ticks were first spotted at Admiral’s Cove Park in Bedford in 2006.

It’s one of five areas in the province where Lyme disease and the ticks that carry it have been found.

Researchers at Mount Allison University said the number of ticks carrying the disease has jumped from 15 per cent to 40 per cent in New Brunswick.

Professor Vett Lloyd said numbers haven’t been confirmed in Nova Scotia, but it’s possible the results are similar.

“There are probably pockets where the frequency is 40 per cent, there may also be small regions where the frequency is higher,” Lloyd said.

Two years ago the province overruled a decision by city council to spray an insecticide all around Admiral’s Cove Park to try to control the spread of the tick.

Deer baiting stations may be the best defence against the spread of the disease.

As the deer bends its neck to eat corn, an insecticide is applied that’s supposed kill any tick on its body.

Stopping the spread

Andrew Hebda, an entomologist at the Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History, said he believes the increase isn’t as high as some scientists claim it to be, but there’s no stopping the spread.

see full story:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2012/09/04/ns-lyme-disease-nova-scotia.html

A Close Up Of An Adult Female, An Adult Male, Nymph And Larva Tick Is Shown June 15, 2001. Ticks Cause An Acute Inflammatory Disease Characterized By Skin Changes, Joint Inflammation, And Flu-Like Symptoms Called Lyme Disease. Photograph by Stock

BY GWEN BARLEE, TIMES COLONIST JULY 5, 2012 Two weeks ago, something remarkable happened. Dr. Robbin Lindsay, a research scientist with the Public Health Agency of Canada, said he feared a “disease explosion” in regards to Lyme disease, a serious tick-borne infection now found throughout southern Canada.

Climate change has created more hospitable habitat for ticks that carry Lyme disease and, increasingly, infected ticks are found in higher numbers and in areas they weren’t found before.

Lyme disease is a serious infection. If a person bitten by an infected tick is treated promptly and robustly with antibiotics, the disease can be stopped in its tracks. However, if the disease is left untreated or misdiagnosed, the bacteria moves quickly out of the bloodstream into joints, cartilage and even into the brain, becoming an entrenched infection that can leave people in wheelchairs.

Lyme disease is known as the “great imitator” because it is a multi-system infection that mimics other chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis, chronic fatigue, rheumatoid arthritis and even deadly Lou Gehrig’s disease. It is problematic to diagnose – the standard blood tests in Canada are notoriously unreliable. Matters are further complicated by the fact that many medical practitioners in Canada still believe Lyme disease is a rare and easy-to-treat condition.

Although the disease has exploded in the United States over the past 20 years, culminating in more than 30,000 diagnosed or suspected cases in 2010, here in Canada, where infected ticks seem to stop at the border, only 150 cases are diagnosed annually. Lack of medical knowledge, combined with inaccurate blood tests, has resulted in misdiagnosis and forced many infected Canadians to go south of the border and pay for medical treatment they should be able to get in Canada.

See full link:

http://www.vancouversun.com/touch/health/story.html?id=6887899

Bartonella: the epidemic you’ve never heard of
05.30.2012 | Tracey Peake

As if you needed another reason to hate fleas.

This is the first installment of a three-part series on Bartonella, bacteria that is being linked to a wide variety of ailments – many of them chronic, and some of them life-threatening. In part one, I’ll talk about what Bartonella is, and its growing recognition as a potentially very serious infectious disease. Part two will cover the wide array of transmission vectors and illnesses associated with the bacteria, and part three will review the current state of the research and recommendations for the future.

Dr. Ed Breitschwerdt is an expert on infectious diseases and a doctor of veterinary medicine. He also finds himself on the front lines of a quiet but growing epidemic. Bartonella is a bacteria most commonly associated with cat scratch disease, which until recently was thought to be a short-lived (or self-limiting, in medical lingo) infection. Bartonella isn’t new –doctors have known about cat scratch disease for almost a century – but it’s only in the past couple of decades that researchers like Breitschwerdt have started to discover exactly how pervasive Bartonella infecton is in animals and people.

“The main problem with determining whether Bartonella is involved with a particular illness has traditionally been the difficulty of culturing the bacteria from patient samples,” Breitschwerdt says. Some of his earliest work was simply dedicated to finding a better way to identify the presence of the bacteria in an animal or human. It’s fairly easy to find evidence of Bartonella in “reservoir hosts,” or the animals that harbor the bacteria: currently, researchers use a combination of serology and PCR (which stands for polymerase chain reaction) to identify Bartonella’s bacterial DNA in samples.

Finding it in potentially infected humans, however, takes a bit more specialized testing. Breitschwerdt had to develop a specialized growth media in order to be able to culture the bacteria in numbers great enough to detect using a standard PCR test.

Once Breitschwerdt and other researchers had the proper tools to look for evidence of the bacteria they found that Bartonella is literally all around us.

“We have found species of Bartonella in mammals ranging from mice to sheep to sea otters to dolphins,” he says. “There are at least 30 different species that we know of right now, and 13 of those have been found to infect human beings.”

SEE THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE HERE:

http://web.ncsu.edu/abstract/science/bartonella-epidemic/

Recent 3 part series on Bartonella:

http://web.ncsu.edu/abstract/science/bartonella-epidemic/
http://web.ncsu.edu/abstract/science/bartonella-2/
http://web.ncsu.edu/abstract/science/bartonella-3/

Same thing going on in the East. Let the FOIPOP’s start raining down. West to East same BS !!

BY STEPHEN HUME, VANCOUVER SUN JUNE 6, 2012 The provincial government routinely fails its legal duty to promptly inform citizens of risks to public health and safety, warn legal scholars at the University of Victoria.

Failures to disclose include air pollution, deteriorating infrastructure, parasite infestations, contaminated water and disease risk. Relevant information has been withheld from potential victims, scientists and the media – in some cases for almost a decade, says the university’s Environmental Law Clinic following a study of six cases across B.C.

On Tuesday, the group asked the province’s information and privacy commissioner for a full investigation into what it says appears to be “an ongoing system-wide failure” by government to disclose in timely fashion information with clear public safety implications.

The pattern needs to be addressed “before a catastrophe occurs,” it warned.

“Concerns about ‘panicking’ the public must not become an excuse for withholding information,” the call for investigation says. “In many cases, the fact that the information is alarming is precisely why it must be disclosed.”

The submission, filed on behalf of the B.C. Freedom of Information and Privacy Association, says that under provincial law, public bodies are required to act “without delay” in publicly disclosing information about any “risk of significant harm to the environment or to the health or safety of the public.”

Also….

And in 2008, the researchers say, the BC Centre for Disease Control and the Provincial Health Services Authority are alleged to have failed to promptly disclose at least two pieces of critical information about tick-borne Lyme disease.

Lyme disease is thought to be relatively rare in B.C. and is difficult to diagnose. It is caused by a bacteria transmitted by tick bites. It can have grave effects if not properly treated, but its symptoms often mimic or are masked by those from other serious disorders, creating multiple identification and treatment problems for health professionals and patients.

The UVic researchers say a key study conducted in 2008 and 2009 found that a substantial portion of Lyme disease cases in B.C. go unreported to provincial health authorities by doctors, despite legal obligations to report.

That study suggested that actual Lyme disease cases could be up to 25 times more numerous than previous official estimates. The finding was not released until 2011.

And provincial health authorities waited a year before releasing another key study on chronic Lyme disease in 2010, the submission says.

That study found that testing and treatment in B.C. were poor, that the actual level of infection in B.C. was unknown and that most medical doctors lacked adequate knowledge about the disease and its prevalence.

These findings were not released until 2011 -and only then in response to a freedom of information request, the researchers say.

“This information would have helped B.C. residents and doctors to educate themselves about the risks posed by Lyme disease, empowered people to take preventive measures to reduce their risks of contracting Lyme disease and contributed to an important discussion about changes to policy or law needed to grapple with the risks posed to public health,” the researchers wrote.

But it’s not just the provincial government that is failing to inform the public of potential health or other risks despite obligations to do so, the legal researchers say.

See full story here (nearly a full page):

http://www.vancouversun.com/touch/health/story.html?id=6737535

THIS SHOULD READ…CHANCES OF GETTING LYME IN P.E.I- AS RARE AS BIRD SIGHTINGS!!
How sad the public will falsely trust these Articles from our Health care. Great comment from C.P.
*************

Prince Edward Island

Chances of contracting Lyme disease on the Island may be slim, but a recent increase of cases in Atlantic Canada is cause to be more vigilant, says P.E.I.’s Chief Public Health Office.

The disease is caused by a bacteria found in some deer ticks, and can be passed to humans through a bite.

The Public Health Agency of Canada recently said instances of the disease are on the rise across the country, with more disease-carrying ticks reported in Nova Scotia, New Bruswick, Manitoba and Ontario.

But Dr. Heather Morrison, the Island’s Chief Public Health Officer, said cases of Lyme disease originating in this province are non-existent.

“There’s never been a case of Lyme disease diagnosed in a human in P.E.I., who acquired the disease from a tick bite in P.E.I.,” Morrison said.

“Deer ticks can be brought in by migratory birds, for instance, so the concern is always to be vigilant. Given what’s going on in our neighbouring provinces, we’re certainly concerned about increasing Lyme disease in ticks.”

She added that some patients have been diagnosed with the disease on the Island in the past, but their tick bites always originated in other areas.

The public health office sends a letter to all physicians in the provinces around this time of year, reminding them to submit any ticks they find for testing, along with information on how to test for Lyme disease in humans.

Pets can also be susceptible to bites and Lyme disease. Morrison said Charlottetown’s Atlantic Veterinary College follows a similar testing procedure with any ticks it finds on animals.

The main symptoms of Lyme in humans include: The appearance of a rash, and non-specific flu-like symptoms such as headaches, fevers, aches and pains.

“Those symptoms usually start three to 32 days after a known, possible tick bite,” Morrison explained. “Lyme disease is able to be treated with antibiotics, and the main tests for it are… blood tests. Sometimes it requires initial testing, but also follow-up testing 30 days later.”

sbrun@journalpioneer.com

See link:

http://www.journalpioneer.com/News/Local/2012-05-23/article-2986526/Islanders-should-be-vigilant-of-Lyme-carrying-ticks:-Chief-Public-Health-Officer/1

À few interesting links:

Coyote Management in Prince Edward Island www.gov.pe.ca/…/fae_coyote_man.pdf

Birds Disperse Ixodid (Acari: Ixodidae) and Borrelia …
www.nabernet.com/mainfiles/…/1043.pdf

Biological control of ticks
www.peipfi-komdasulsel.org/…/CBPV_ …

Panel of experts bring new perspectives to Morgellons Research.

Austin, TX (PRWEB) May 02, 2012 A multinational panel of medical and scientific professionals met on March 24 and 25, 2012 in Austin, Texas at the 5th annual Morgellons Medical Conference entitled, “Searching for the Uncommon Thread” to discuss the latest findings on Morgellons disease. Morgellons is a debilitating, systemic illness characterized by the formation of unusual fibers within the skin. In addition to slow-healing skin lesions, those afflicted by the illness also experience overwhelming fatigue, and an array of neurological deficits. Morgellons affects people of all ages and ethnic groups, worldwide. Sponsored by The Charles E. Holman Foundation (CEHF), the two-day event boasted attendees comprised of doctors, scientists, Morgellons patients and supporters. Much of this conference was dedicated to refuting the conclusions suggested by the 2011 study by Hylwa et al, of the Mayo Clinic, and the January 25th, 2012 Center for Disease Control (CDC)/Kaiser Permanente Morgellons study.

Highlights of the two-day event included many educational and thought provoking presentations. Canadian microbiologist, Marianne Middelveen, reported on ground-breaking research that she and prominent San Francisco-based physician, Raphael Stricker, published recently in Clinical Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3257881. This research demonstrates similarities between Morgellons and a bovine spirochetal disease.

“The unusual filaments associated with Morgellons are likely composed of keratin and demonstrated photographic evidence that fibers stem from both pavement epithelial cells and hair follicles, tissues where keratinocytes are the predominant cell type,” stated Dr. Middelveen. According to Middleveen “these findings conclusively debunk the erroneous theory that this disease is caused by delusional beliefs and that patients self-implant fibers or are intentionally mutilating themselves”. A second publication related to this subject authored by Middelveen, Stricker and other collaborating researchers, is currently in-press and scheduled to be published soon.

Australian Dermatologist, Peter Mayne, showed clear slides of fibers taken from some of his many Morgellons patients, noting that fibers are subdermal in origin and some originate in the hair bulb. Dr. Mayne is the first practicing dermatologist to thoroughly examine the tissue of Morgellons patients and acknowledge the disease’s unique pathological characteristics. Mayne outlined differential diagnoses he considers in his Australian clinical practice. Dr. Mayne, along with Randy S. Wymore, PhD., Director of Research at the Center for the Investigation of Morgellons disease, reviewed the history of the CDC’s noninvolvement with Morgellons disease, and refuted the 2012 CDC/Kaiser study results. A presentation on Institutional Cognitive Dissonance by CEHF Director, Cindy Casey, RN, in collaboration with Elizabeth Rasmussen, PhD, further demonstrated the repudiation by the CDC in its lawful responsibilities towards Morgellons patients as well as to their confused and bewildered medical care providers.

CEHF Associate Director, Greg Smith, a pediatrician from Georgia, Dr. Amelia Withington, a Psychiatrist from Pennsylvania, Ginger Savely, DNP, a recognized authority in the medical management of Morgellons disease from Washington, D.C., and Carsten Nicolaus, MD, PhD from Augsburg, Germany, an esteemed medical provider for Morgellons patients in Europe, also gave informative presentations covering a broad range of Morgellons-related topics.

The Morgellons medical conference is an annual gathering in Austin, Texas of medical and scientific professionals and members of the Morgellons community. Sponsored by The Charles E. Holman Foundation in Austin, Texas, its purpose is to discuss the latest scientific discoveries in Morgellons research. The foundation was named for Charles E. Holman, a pioneer in the fight against Morgellons disease.

The official DVD of the conference is now available. To order a copy of the DVD, please visit http://www.thecehf.org.

###

Cindy Casey, Director The Charles E. Holman Foundation (415) 720-8752 Email Information

See link:

http://gma.yahoo.com/exciting-discoveries-morgellons-research-unveiled-annual-conference-070428812.html

Lyme Disease: The Perfect Storm Is Headed Our Way Leo Galland, M.D. | Apr 18, 2012 08:06 AM EDT

Blood-sucking ticks coming to a field and forest near you.

That may sound like the latest horror film, but unfortunately it is a reality due to a surge in ticks that spread Lyme disease this spring.

Fortunately, the media interest in Lyme disease appears to be growing with the threat. At the start of the month I was interviewed on Martha Stewart Living Radio about Lyme disease.

The Perfect Storm for Lyme Disease

A perfect storm happens when two conditions converge to amplify each other’s effects. Two conditions are creating what may become the perfect storm for transmission of Lyme disease this spring:

An unusually warm winter, which left deer ticks alive,hungry and looking for a meal.

A dramatic flip-flop in the acorn cycle: A large crop of acorns in the fall of 2010 and a very small crop in 2011 in the East. This means fewer mice for the ticks to feed upon, as I explain below.

These two conditions mean tons of deer ticks that are hungry and lacking their typical food supply. You could be their next meal.

Ticks Transmit Lyme and Other Diseases

The bacteria that cause Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, are transmitted to humans by the bite of a deer tick (Ixodes dammini).

Deer ticks live for two years and in their lifetimes take only three blood meals: the first as newborn larvae, the second a year later as immature nymphs and the third a season later as adults.

Mice and Other Rodents Carry Ticks Too

If you don’t see any deer and think the coast is clear, think again.

FULL STORY:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mobileweb/leo-galland-md/lyme-disease_b_1429984.html

Dr. Phil after the “Deadly Consequence’s” show stated he should have touched more on the “Key Elements” regarding the Conflicts of Interest pertaining to Lyme.
That comment was HUGE !!
Thankyou again !!

See link here:

http://www.drphil.com/uncut/page/uncensored/

Naturopathic Management of Chronic Lyme Disease
by Dr. Bryan J. Rade

Dr. Bryan Rade, ND

What is Chronic Lyme Disease?
Chronic Lyme is an infectious disease initiated by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.  It is associated with a vast milieu of symptoms (indeed, it is known as the great mimicker and can present with symptom pictures similar to chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, etc.).  Most commonly its symptoms include:
-          Fatigue
-          Pain (joints, muscles, etc.)
-          Neurological symptoms (numbness, tingling, spasms, etc.)
-          Cognitive symptoms (“brain fog”, loss of memory, anxiety, depression, etc.)
-          Cyclical symptoms (periods of symptom improvement and worsening)
…however this is by no means a comprehensive list, and every chronic Lyme patient is unique.
 
What about the co-infections?
Lyme is also frequently associated with so-called co-infections; other microorganisms can infect the patient at the same time as Lyme (i.e. transmitted by the same mosquito, fly, or tick) or can infect the host while it is immunocompromised by the Lyme.  The co-infections can include Babesia, Erlichia, and/or Bartonella.
 
For some patients, the co-infection(s) may indeed be the ONLY infection(s) (i.e. Lyme may actually be cleared from the system, or never present at all – this can account for why we see so many false negatives in Lyme testing) – this is impossible to definitively determine clinically because the co-infection microbes can present with identical symptoms to Lyme (which are non-specific to begin with).  Generally, though, the co-infections can have some specific attributes:
-          Babesia: cherry angiomas (red dots) on the abdomen, issues with breathing (inability to take a deep breath or “air hunger”)
-          Bartonella: red streaks on the abdomen (like scratches), enlarged lymph nodes in the neck
-          Erlichia: not associated with specific attributes distinct from Lyme; sometimes presents with sharp, knife-like pain behind eyes
 
Are there definitive tests available?
No. Unfortunately the tests that do exist have an abysmally high false negative rate (i.e. they frequently say no infection is present when indeed there is one present).  The sensitivity of comprehensive testing is estimated at 40%.  To test for co-infections, separate tests need to be conducted for them.  The average cost of a comprehensive lab panel with the highly reputable lab IgeneX is approximately $1000 USD.  Statistically speaking, several of these would need to be run in order to definitively rule out Lyme in the face of a negative result (conversely, if one is “lucky” enough to get a positive result then that can be used to base treatment on).
 
 
In the absence of a positive lab result, what can we do?
We start with a “therapeutic trial”, meaning that we start treatment as if the patient has Lyme (and/or a co-infection, if symptoms suggest it) and see if their symptoms improve or change in a way that suggests we have the right diagnosis.  Indeed, this method typically shows us results one way or the other within about one months’ time (i.e. if the patient feels better it strongly suggests Lyme; if they feel no change it’s less likely to be Lyme) and is significantly less expensive than running the independent lab tests.
 
Are there any non-laboratory tests that can give diagnostic information?
Yes.  Specialized testing like Autonomic Response Testing as developed by Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt, MD (one of the world’s leading Lyme experts) can give diagnostic direction, as can related testing methods like applied kinesiology and Koren Specific Technique.
 
What are the treatment options?
It depends on who you talk to.  Lyme-literate medical doctors typically rely on antibiotic therapy as their primary method of treatment – this can be a combination of oral and intravenous administration.  These MDs get many fantastic results with their patients and have fully resolved many, many cases.  The antibiotic approach is oftentimes associated with periods of “die off” reactions which can lead to unpleasant symptoms, and treatment can sometimes take a long time (several months to a few years, on average).
 
Lyme-literate integrative doctors (either medical doctors or naturopathic doctors) take a somewhat different approach.  Ideally they like to see patients taking antibiotic therapy (assuming that antibiotics are a good therapeutic tool for the patient) while being supported with other anti-Lyme treatments and treatments to support the patient during the Lyme-killing process.  In doing so, patients are able to resolve the infection(s) faster, feel better sooner, and reduce the “die off” symptoms as much as possible.
 
Unfortunately, in some situations antibiotics are not an option (e.g. in Nova Scotia if there is no prescribing medical doctor then a treating naturopathic doctor cannot get access to antibiotics) and thus a non-antibiotic approach is the only option.  Indeed, this is virtually always the case for my Lyme patients and me; however we are still able to improve and eventually fully resolve symptoms without antibiotics (although, once again, we would rather have the antibiotics, too, if possible).
 
What are the naturopathic/integrative medical treatment options?
There are many.  The treatments that I have found to be most effective with my patients include:
-          IV therapy: combination of hydrogen peroxide (kills Lyme and co-infections) and nutrients (B vitamins, magnesium, etc. – to improve energy levels, pain, brain fog, etc.)
-          Anti-Lyme herbs: specific herbs have bacterial killing effects and boost the immune system to seek out and kill Lyme more effectively.  My favourite is Quintessence by BioPure, as recommended by Dr. Klinghardt; additional herbal compounds like artemesinin (for Babesia) and essential oil combinations (rizols) have a powerful synergistic effect against Lyme
-          Immune system enhancement/“waking it up”: Lyme has devised many ways to evade the immune system while still wreaking havoc on the body.  Herbs can help in the regard, but more advanced treatments are often required to really “wake up” the immune system and get it properly patrolling the whole body.  Two advanced treatments include:
o   Autonosode therapy: a simple, in-office procedure that vastly improves the ability of the immune system to scour the body’s connective tissues and nervous system for Lyme (places it frequently hides to evade the immune system)
o   Sinus/Tonsil Neural and Ozone therapy: in-office treatment of these areas with procaine and ozone strongly enhances overall immune system function and directly kills Lyme in two of its main reservoirs in the body (i.e. the sinuses and tonsils)
-          CCSVI (Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency) Protocol: can be done along with sinus/tonsil treatment to enhance blood flow to the brain (in a similar manner to how the Zamboni treatment helps patients with MS) – done as a treatment with procaine and ozone in-office
-          Adrenal Gland Support: our adrenal glands control our energy levels and get depleted in the face of stress.  Chronic Lyme is incredibly stressful on the body and thus the adrenals are virtually always depleted in these patients.  Support with strong doses of herbs and adrenal gland extracts help improve energy levels and mental function quickly.
-          Reducing EMF exposure: EMFs (electromagnetic fields) can significantly aggravate symptoms of Lyme, especially issues with brain fog and insomnia.  Reducing exposure during sleep is crucial to improve recovery time.
-          Dealing with other issues as they arise: in my experience, patients who are actively killing Lyme begin to have other issues arise.  Sometimes they start actively clearing heavy metals (indicated by developing headaches, a metallic taste in the mouth, aggravation by strong scents/chemicals, etc.) or clearing past emotional issues.  Sometimes old symptoms from years before come to the surface again.  As these issues arise they must be dealt with to help the Lyme to be cleared as efficiently as possible.
-          Other therapies: many other therapies can potentially be useful in anti-Lyme protocols, including bee venom therapy, homeopathy, treatments to boost natural killer cells, etc.  Ideally individualized testing is done using autonomic response testing or a similar technique to determine the ideal treatment protocol.
 
What is the take-home message?
Chronic Lyme is an incredibly challenging issue, made even more challenging by its lack of recognition in the conventional medical community.  Fortunately there are many concerned doctors who are willing to treat what they see, not just what a lab test tells them.  A great deal of support is available to patients who are suffering from chronic Lyme – we’re all working together to spread information and ultimately help people get well.  To the well-trained clinical eye chronic Lyme disease (and its co-infections) is an identifiable condition even in the absence of a positive laboratory result.  From there, effective and comprehensive treatment options are available. 

Dr. Bryan J. Rade, ND
Naturopathic Doctor

Lower Sackville Wellness Centre
546 Sackville Drive
Lower Sackville NS B4C 2S2
P: (902) 830-4615
F: (902) 252-3081
dr.bryanrade@gmail.com
www.bryanradend.com

Please view link and visit his website at:

http://bryanradend.com/index.php?news&nid=27

www.bryanradend.com

*** Dr. Rade is also giving a thorough discussion on Chronic Lyme disease at the Lower Sackville Wellness Center ~ 546 Sackville Dr., Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia on Tues, March 13, 2012 @ 6:30 pm.
To register Please phone Dr. Rades Reception desk @ (902) 830-4615 ***

MS Wars: Hope, Science and the Internet

Thursday, February 9, 2012 8:00 PM on CBC-TV
Thursday February 16 at 10 pm ET/PT on CBC News Network

Multiple sclerosis is a debilitating disease, and there is no cure.  Then, a radical new theory appears to offer hope to patients.  The medical community is lukewarm to the concept, yet the Internet is buzzing with positive stories and outcomes. What happens when the medical system and hope collide?
The effects of MS are cruel – fatigue, loss of muscle control and increasing debility.  In 2009, there was suddenly a ray of hope, a treatment that showed signs of helping MS patients. 

Dr. Paolo Zamboni
In northern Italy, research scientist Dr. Paolo Zamboni reported a correlation between blocked neck veins and MS.  He pioneered a new treatment, called Liberation Therapy, unblocking the jugular veins to help with a condition he calls chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency or CCSVI.  The idea and treatment were a radical departure from accepted practice. 
The small research paper was published online before it was published in print. Immediately, this research was circulating internationally via social media circles, creating a sudden explosion of attention.  With an increasing number of patients electing to get the treatment in private clinics, video testimonies soon began to appear on the Internet showing miraculous improvements.

A patient seeks treatment in Costa Rica  Many began travelling out of the country for the procedure paying for their own treatment – often without telling their physicians. 
The medical community has developed protocols, processes and systems concerning research and patient care.  These have survived politics, wars and the test of time.  But, this time, the medical research system was challenged by two factors: hope, and the Internet.
MS Wars is a one hour documentary that delves into the science, controversy and human drama around Liberation Therapy.  It is a tale that explores how the Internet has spurred a social network movement that is changing the doctor/patient relationship and the repercussions for physician and institutions.

See full story here:

http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episode/ms-wars-hope-science-and-the-internet.html

Eleanor D. Hynote
, Phyllis C. Mervine
, Raphael B. Stricker
Received 31 August 2011; accepted 6 October 2011. published online 21 November 2011.
Abstract
Full Text
PDF
References
Abstract 
Lyme disease transmission to humans by Ixodes ticks is thought to require at least 36–48 h of tick attachment. We describe 3 cases in which transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, appears to have occurred in less than 24 h based on the degree of tick engorgement, clinical signs of acute infection, and immunologic evidence of acute Lyme disease. Health care providers and individuals exposed to ticks should be aware that transmission of Lyme disease may occur more rapidly than animal models suggest. A diagnosis of Lyme disease should not be ruled out based on a short tick attachment time in a subject with clinical evidence of B. burgdorferi infection.

http://www.dmidjournal.com/article/S0732-8893(11)00415-9/abstract

Abstract Top
Bartonella spp. are facultative intracellular vector-borne bacteria associated with several emerging diseases in humans and animals all over the world. The potential for involvement of ticks in transmission of Bartonella spp. has been heartily debated for many years. However, most of the data supporting bartonellae transmission by ticks come from molecular and serological epidemiological surveys in humans and animals providing only indirect evidences without a direct proof of tick vector competence for transmission of bartonellae. We used a murine model to assess the vector competence of Ixodes ricinus for Bartonella birtlesii. Larval and nymphal I. ricinus were fed on a B. birtlesii-infected mouse. The nymphs successfully transmitted B. birtlesii to naïve mice as bacteria were recovered from both the mouse blood and liver at seven and 16 days after tick bites. The female adults successfully emitted the bacteria into uninfected blood after three or more days of tick attachment, when fed via membrane feeding system. Histochemical staining showed the presence of bacteria in salivary glands and muscle tissues of partially engorged adult ticks, which had molted from the infected nymphs. These results confirm the vector competence of I. ricinus for B. birtlesii and represent the first in vivo demonstration of a Bartonella sp. transmission by ticks. Consequently, bartonelloses should be now included in the differential diagnosis for patients exposed to tick bites.

http://www.plosntds.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0001186