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November 28th, 2012
Dear Nova Scotia MLA/MP:
RE: Lyme Disease in Nova Scotia
Lyme Disease (LD) is an emerging disease in Nova Scotia and Canada that is generating considerable attention from the media, advocacy groups and communities. Given this situation, I felt it important that you had accurate and up-to-date information on LD in Nova Scotia and the provincial response plan.
LD is a bacterial illness that can be transmitted to humans through the bite of a blacklegged tick (deer tick). There are a number of tick species in Nova Scotia, but only the blacklegged tick can carry the bacteria that can cause LD. Not all blacklegged ticks carry the bacteria and the risk of acquiring LD remains low in the province. LD is readily treatable with appropriate antibiotics.
The Department of Health and Wellness (DHW) has an active LD response plan which includes an interdisciplinary committee (public health, veterinary medicine, wildlife biology) that provides evidence-based advice and guidance to the provincial government on the control of LD. Nova Scotia has multiple infectious disease and medical microbiologist experts in the province who deal with treatment and diagnosis of LD. DHW has a close working relationship with these clinical experts through an Infectious Disease Expert Group, which meets regularly to advise DHW on public health and infection control issues. We also work closely with our partners at the Public Health Agency of Canada and the National Microbiology Laboratory who provide evidence based recommendations for the prevention and surveillance of LD and ticks.
Tick and Lyme Disease Surveillance
Lyme disease is a notifiable disease under the National Microbiology Laboratory. Health care professionals are required to report cases of Lyme disease to Public Health when they diagnose clients clinically or with laboratory confirmation. In 2011, there were 54 confirmed cases of LD reported to Public Health, corresponding to an incidence rate of 5.8 cases per 100,000 population. Surveillance of both human cases and blacklegged ticks in the province enables DHW to keep abreast of the current state of Lyme disease in Nova Scotia.
Over the past few years, DHW together with the Department of Natural Resources and the Public Health Agency of Canada have been identifying and testing ticks collected in Nova Scotia. Analysis of this data has identified six areas where blacklegged ticks carrying the bacteria that can cause LD are known to be endemic (i.e. have become established as part of the local ecology). These endemic locations are areas in Yarmouth County, Shelburne County, Lunenburg County, Halifax County, Pictou County and most recently Queens County. These known endemic areas can be found on the Department of Health and Wellness website at http://www.gov.ns.ca/hpp/cdpc/lyme.asp
DHW has had a tick surveillance program in place since 2002, which included both passive (ticks being submitted by the public) and active plans. In the fall of 2011, DHW restructured its tick surveillance program to place an emphasis on active surveillance. Active surveillance involves ‘in the field’ work including small mammal testing and dragging vegetation to collect
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ticks. We will continue with focused active surveillance to determine additional areas where ticks may be establishing.
It is expected the number of LD cases will increase over time as ticks become more densely populated and expand their geographical range when conditions permit. Climate change related to global warming is expected to contribute to the increase of LD in Nova Scotia and Canada.
Public Information
DHW regularly provides consistent, evidence based information about LD and its prevention to the public. Strategies are implemented each year to provide Nova Scotians with information about the prevention of tick bites and to ensure health care providers have the most up to date clinical information. The DHW website is regularly updated plus we work closely with partners to disseminate information regarding LD to the public and stakeholders via various methods (letters via schools, residential letters, media releases, websites, signs in parks/campgrounds). DHW has also provided an advertorial for newspapers as well as news release each year. DHW regularly responds to multiple media requests and letters to government regarding LD.
Nova Scotians and visitors to the province can help prevent exposure to blacklegged ticks and LD by taking some simple precautions. This is especially important when in areas where there may be increased risk. Prevention messages can be found on the DHW website at: http://www.gov.ns.ca/hpp/cdpc/lyme.asp
Information to Clinicians
Webinars have been provided to health care providers in the last few years, addressing prevention, surveillance, diagnosis and treatment of LD. In addition, the DHW provides updates to physicians in the province via Doctors Nova Scotia. The Infectious Disease Expert Group has developed a document entitled “Statement for Managing Lyme Disease in Nova Scotia” which has been widely circulated to physicians in the province. This document is based on current evidence and follows the guidelines endorsed by the Infectious Disease Society of America.
Testing
Laboratory testing for LD in Nova Scotia follows the guidelines established by the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. These guidelines have been endorsed by the Canadian Public Health Laboratories Network and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
We are aware of the Canadian Lyme disease advocacy group, Can Lyme, who claim that the testing and treatment of LD is inadequate. However, the testing methods they promote, and the ones used by many private labs in the US, are not endorsed by infectious disease and laboratory experts.
Research
DHW supports and partners with many researchers in the field of LD and tick surveillance. Research that DHW is aware of and supports includes the Public Health Agency of Canada’s study on identification of emerging endemic areas for the blacklegged tick and prediction of the further spread of LD. Two other research initiatives that DHW supports include the human seroprevalence study on LD and the Deer Treatment Study. We are aware that other
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researchers initiate studies within the province with or without consultation or consideration of experts on the interdisciplinary committee.
If you have additional questions regarding LD, or if you would like to involve a regional Medical Officer of Health in any meetings with community or advocacy groups, please contact your local Public Health office which can be found through the following website: http://novascotia.ca/DHW/about/phs-offices.asp
We appreciate your ongoing support and cooperation to help ensure Nova Scotians receive evidence-based information on LD.
Sincerely,
Robert Strang MD, MHSc., FRCPC
Chief Medical Officer of Health
c. Dr. Frank Atherton – Deputy Chief Medical Officer of Health, Health and Wellness
Elaine Holmes, Director – Communicable Disease Prevention and Control, Health and Wellness
Regional Medical Officers of Health

Published Friday, December 17,2010
By Erin dwyer for the Telegraph-journal

HAMPTON – The town is looking to follow the lead of neighbouring municipalities that have banned the feeding of deer.

Councillor Robert Doucet motioned to have town staff investigate the possibility of creating a bylaw much like the communities in the Kennebecasis Valley. Both Quispamsis and Rothesay have enacted ones that would see residents fined for feeding deer.

“I think we need to come up to speed with Quispamsis and Rothesay,” Doucet said. “I recommend staff do some research on other municipalities and come up with a recommendation.”

It’s not the first time the town has talked about dealing with its deer problem.

See more here:

http://telegraphjournal.canadaeast.com/city/article/1356209

Published on July 31st, 2008
Published on January 1st, 2010
Monique Chiasson

HILDEN – Don Hamilton hopes this time next week he will know whether or not he has Lyme disease.
The senior citizen was working in his Hilden yard last Friday as he usually does.
Upon taking a break, he felt a pest biting him and assumed it was a black fly or mosquito.
“I went to pick it off my leg and it was a tick,” said Hamilton.
He bagged the creature with the intention of passing it to his doctor for testing to see what breed it is and if it carries Lyme disease.
But before he saw his regular doctor earlier this week, Hamilton had to deal with a red, itchy, swollen leg.
“I wanted to claw at it for two days. It was swollen and red under an hour” of being bitten.
The bite also kept him from sleeping well because it was so irritated, he said.
He has been to the emergency department and was given ointment and antibiotics, which appear to be working.

Read Story here:

http://www.trurodaily.com/Personal-finance/2008-07-31/article-352345/Tick-bite-leaves-man-a-little-concerned/1

Halifax News Net

Published on July 31, 2009

By Lindsay Jones – The Weekly News

There are more reports of blacklegged ticks in the metro area this summer, but so far, none have tested positive for Lyme disease outside of the established area of Bedford.
Haligonians have discovered and submitted about 40 blacklegged ticks so far this summer – up from about a half dozen turned in last year, says Andrew Hebda, a zoologist at the Museum of Natural History.
“In part, there’s increased awareness so people are looking for ticks,” Hebda said.
“The other thing is … people are seeing a lot more ticks.”
Dog or wood ticks, which don’t carry diseases, are now being found in large numbers both in peninsular Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford and Sackville. The public has brought about 90 of them to the museum so far this summer, Hebda added.
Blacklegged ticks have been found in Halifax, specifically in Spryfield, York Redoubt National Historic Site and Fergusons Cove, as well as Fergusons Cove. None have been found to carry Lyme disease.
“The issue with blacklegged ticks is they’re been moved around by birds … and where we’re finding them is pretty well scattered throughout the province in random places,” Hebda said.
Blacklegged ticks are brown to reddish-orange, lack white markings on their backs and are much smaller than dog ticks. Their legs aren’t necessarily black.
When they’re hungry, they climb up tall grass or short shrubs and hang on with their front legs until a person or animal walks by. If they’re knocked off the plant, they start climbing up the body – rarely above the waistline – before they start embedding. Ticks found in the scalp line are usually dog ticks.

BLACKLEGGED TICKS AND LYME DISEASE

The earliest and most common symptom of Lyme disease is a bull’s-eye rash at the site of a tick bite. Other symptoms include fever, fatigue, muscle aches and headaches.
Lyme disease can be cured with antibiotics if detected early.
The disease can lead to more serious illnesses such as facial palsy (a weakening of facial muscles) and heart or chronic joint problems if untreated, though they’re rare.
Nova Scotia’s Department of Health Promotion and Protection suggests the top ways to avoid getting Lyme disease:
* Protect yourself from ticks by using insect repellent containing DEET.
* Cover as much skin as possible when outdoors.
* Check yourself and your children for ticks after outdoor activities in areas where blacklegged ticks are established.
Source: Department of Health Promotion
and Protection

“If you go for a walk in the woods, stick to the path,” Hebda said. “Keep your grass a little bit lower.”
A blacklegged tick may start feeding 24 to 48 hours after it lands on you. Hebda suggested checking for ticks by feeling for new bumps on the skin after returning from a walk. If you discover a tick, don’t use Vaseline or oil. Grab the tick firmly at the base and pull it straight out.
“We need all the feeding bits to be able to confirm the identification,” he said. “And if you leave some bits inside you they could get infected.”
He asked that people put the tick in a vial or tape it to a piece of cardstock and bring it into the museum on Summer Street in Halifax, or to any Department of Natural Resources office in the province. Jot down as much information as possible about the area the tick was found, and where it may have been picked up.
“The more information that accompanies it the better, because we’re trying to confirm where are all the tick species in the province, when are they appearing and if any diseases appear,” Hebda said.
The areas where blacklegged ticks have tested positive for Lyme disease include the Admiral’s Cove Park area in Bedford, andBedfordand Shelburne counties.
lindsayleejones@gmail.com

See Article:

http://www.halifaxnewsnet.ca/Business/2009-07-31/article-989452/Ticks-carrying-Lyme-disease-found-only-in-certain-areas/1