Lyme Disease Halifax

Lyme Disease – Information on Lyme Disease- Life stories of Lyme disease

Browsing Posts tagged class action lawsuit

Protester Janet Conners in Ottawa accuses the government and Canadian blood supply managers of silence and coverups during the tainted blood scandal of the 1970s and '80s. The woman's husband died from AIDS contracted from a blood transfusion. (Andrew Wallace/Canadian Press)

Canada’s blood supply
10 years after Krever, is it safe?
Last Updated April 27, 2007
CBC News

Blood is probably the most precious liquid on Earth. It nourishes and restores life and is shared widely within communities, countries and around the world.

Bad or tainted blood is a human disaster on a similarly vast scale, as scandals in Canada, France, Australia and Britain have shown. A decade ago, this country finally began to come to terms with the criminal tragedy of blood infected with HIV and hepatitis C, and the thousands upon thousands of innocent Canadians who contracted the diseases through blood transfusions.

In November 1997, a royal commission headed by Justice Horace Krever of the Ontario Court of Appeal roundly vilified governments and blood collection agencies for their roles in that dark episode. Criminal charges were laid and the country belatedly took extensive steps to protect the blood supply.

Independent public agencies were set up to collect and protect blood donations in Quebec and the rest of Canada. Extensive testing was introduced at every stage of the process. Politicians and victims of the scandal squared off across a minefield of compensation and liability issues, and slowly but surely the crucial central issue of ensuring a safe blood supply began.

So where do we stand now? Is Canada’s blood supply safe? Is it being adequately protected from existing threats and those that might come along in future? And will we have enough blood to serve an aging population when demographics show that most blood donors are themselves aging, with younger people yet to pick up the demographic slack?

See full Article:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/health/blood-supply.html

 

Chelsey Livingstone and her mom, Angela Rector, organize the many pills Chelsey needs each day as she battles Lyme disease. It’s a costly process that could take from one to three years. Jennifer Vardy Little – The News
Published on May 26, 2011

 

Mom blames poor tests that failed to diagnose Lyme disease

Topics :
Department of Health , Sutherlands River , Ontario , Port Hawkesbury

SUTHERLANDS RIVER – For 8 1/2 years, Angela Rector brought her daughter to doctor after doctor, looking for answers.

Chelsey Livingstone, 11, lives in pain. She describes joints that ache so badly it keeps her up at night and a sharp pain in her stomach.

“It feels like someone’s stabbing me in my belly,” she says softly.

From the time she was a small child, she’d call out to her mother as she lay in bed at night, and in the time it took Rector to get across the hallway, she’d find Chelsey lying there, staring unresponsively at the ceiling with blue lips. Doctors thought she had epilepsy at first, but ruled that out, instead calling the nightly events “episodes.”

Doctors didn’t believe Chelsey when she said how bad the pain was, either.

“You know how they always ask how bad the pain is on a scale of one to 10? She’d say a 15, and they said that was impossible,” said Rector.

She was tested for rheumatoid arthritis, bladder infections, Crohn’s and irritable bowel, but all the possibilities were rejected. Eventually, says Rector, physicians at the IWK suggested it was all in Chelsey’s head and gave her a book on ways to cut back her stress levels.

Rector wasn’t willing to give up, however. All along, she begged the doctors to consider Lyme disease. When Chelsey was just 2 1/2, the family was living in Borden, Ont., and Rector believed her daughter had been bitten by a tick.

See Story here:

http://www.ngnews.ca/News/Local/2011-05-26/article-2538390/Child’s-illness-mystifies-doctors/1