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Browsing Posts tagged Borellia burgdorferi

2500x VFRC vs. HR-dark field (HD 1080/50p) video microscopy of Borrelia sp

Published on Dec 4, 2012

Borrelia spirochete species can hardly be visualized in vital blood due to fast movement and halo effects of conventional dark field illumination. Here we show an improved VFRC (0:00-03:40) and HR (high time and image resolution) dark field (DF) illumination (04:00) using a special condensor with high intensity white LED and a VFRC 110x objective as well as 25-40x zoom lens focussed on a high resolution high sensitivity aps-c cmos chip. Large immune complexes of antibody-precipitated spirochetes, cyst forms of spirochetes, intracellular spirochetes and single vital fast moving spirochetes compromised by antibodies can well be seen in HR-DF, less in VFRC of the freshly isolated capillary blood. The patient is permanently treated by bioresonance, light therapy and herbal remedy therapy specific for neuroborreliosis, according to a novel protocol. Weekly DNA-PCR-tests are performed to screen the blood concentration of borrelia bacteria. The patient is suffering from skin release of spirochete cysts (histiocytomes and leucocytomes) as well as alzheimer-like psycho-neurological disorders. VFRC microscopy and HR-DF are a novel technique invented by Armin Koroknay, Switzerland

Persistence of Borrelia burgdorferi in Rhesus Macaques following Antibiotic Treatment of Disseminated Infection.

“Our studies do however offer proof of the principle that intact spirochetes can persist in an incidental host comparable to humans, following antibiotic therapy. Additionally, our experiments uncover residual antigen associated with inflammatory foci.”

Embers ME, Barthold SW, Borda JT, Bowers L, Doyle L, et al. (2012) Persistence of Borrelia burgdorferi in Rhesus Macaques following Antibiotic Treatment of Disseminated Infection. PLoS ONE 7(1): e29914. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0029914

Abstract

The persistence of symptoms in Lyme disease patients following antibiotic therapy, and their causes, continue to be a matter of intense controversy. The studies presented here explore antibiotic efficacy using nonhuman primates.

Rhesus macaques were infected with B. burgdorferi and a portion received aggressive antibiotic therapy 4–6 months later.

Multiple methods were utilized for detection of residual organisms, including the feeding of lab-reared ticks on monkeys (xenodiagnosis), culture, immunofluorescence and PCR.

Antibody responses to the B. burgdorferi-specific C6 diagnostic peptide were measured longitudinally and declined in all treated animals.

B. burgdorferi antigen, DNA and RNA were detected in the tissues of treated animals.

Finally, small numbers of intact spirochetes were recovered by xenodiagnosis from treated monkeys.

These results demonstrate that B. burgdorferi can withstand antibiotic treatment, administered post-dissemination, in a primate host.

Though B. burgdorferi is not known to possess resistance mechanisms and is susceptible to the standard antibiotics (doxycycline, ceftriaxone) in vitro, it appears to become tolerant post-dissemination in the primate host.

This finding raises important questions about the pathogenicity of antibiotic-tolerant persisters and whether or not they can contribute to symptoms post-treatment.

http://www.plosone.org/article/fetchArticle?articleURI=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0029914

This is video of spirochetes and biofilm found in infected ticks throughout BC from Dr. Kindree and Dr. Banergee from the BC CDC. This video was given to Dr. Murakami by Dr. Kindree.