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Browsing Posts tagged bartonella

Well there you have it… from CDC themselves.  How are you going to deny that… Bartonella in Lice !!!

Volume 19, Number 2—February 2013

Dispatch

Transmission and Maintenance Cycle of Bartonella quintanaamong Rhesus Macaques, China

Abstract

We detected Bartonella quintana in 48.6% of captive rhesus macaques from an animal facility in Beijing, China. Prevalence of infection increased over the period of observation. Our findings suggest that macaques may serve as reservoir hosts for B. quintana and thatPedicinus obtusus lice might act as efficient vectors.

See link for full Article:

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/19/2/12-0816_article.htm

Bartonella: the epidemic you’ve never heard of
05.30.2012 | Tracey Peake

As if you needed another reason to hate fleas.

This is the first installment of a three-part series on Bartonella, bacteria that is being linked to a wide variety of ailments – many of them chronic, and some of them life-threatening. In part one, I’ll talk about what Bartonella is, and its growing recognition as a potentially very serious infectious disease. Part two will cover the wide array of transmission vectors and illnesses associated with the bacteria, and part three will review the current state of the research and recommendations for the future.

Dr. Ed Breitschwerdt is an expert on infectious diseases and a doctor of veterinary medicine. He also finds himself on the front lines of a quiet but growing epidemic. Bartonella is a bacteria most commonly associated with cat scratch disease, which until recently was thought to be a short-lived (or self-limiting, in medical lingo) infection. Bartonella isn’t new –doctors have known about cat scratch disease for almost a century – but it’s only in the past couple of decades that researchers like Breitschwerdt have started to discover exactly how pervasive Bartonella infecton is in animals and people.

“The main problem with determining whether Bartonella is involved with a particular illness has traditionally been the difficulty of culturing the bacteria from patient samples,” Breitschwerdt says. Some of his earliest work was simply dedicated to finding a better way to identify the presence of the bacteria in an animal or human. It’s fairly easy to find evidence of Bartonella in “reservoir hosts,” or the animals that harbor the bacteria: currently, researchers use a combination of serology and PCR (which stands for polymerase chain reaction) to identify Bartonella’s bacterial DNA in samples.

Finding it in potentially infected humans, however, takes a bit more specialized testing. Breitschwerdt had to develop a specialized growth media in order to be able to culture the bacteria in numbers great enough to detect using a standard PCR test.

Once Breitschwerdt and other researchers had the proper tools to look for evidence of the bacteria they found that Bartonella is literally all around us.

“We have found species of Bartonella in mammals ranging from mice to sheep to sea otters to dolphins,” he says. “There are at least 30 different species that we know of right now, and 13 of those have been found to infect human beings.”

SEE THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE HERE:

http://web.ncsu.edu/abstract/science/bartonella-epidemic/

Recent 3 part series on Bartonella:

http://web.ncsu.edu/abstract/science/bartonella-epidemic/
http://web.ncsu.edu/abstract/science/bartonella-2/
http://web.ncsu.edu/abstract/science/bartonella-3/

Abstract Top
Bartonella spp. are facultative intracellular vector-borne bacteria associated with several emerging diseases in humans and animals all over the world. The potential for involvement of ticks in transmission of Bartonella spp. has been heartily debated for many years. However, most of the data supporting bartonellae transmission by ticks come from molecular and serological epidemiological surveys in humans and animals providing only indirect evidences without a direct proof of tick vector competence for transmission of bartonellae. We used a murine model to assess the vector competence of Ixodes ricinus for Bartonella birtlesii. Larval and nymphal I. ricinus were fed on a B. birtlesii-infected mouse. The nymphs successfully transmitted B. birtlesii to naïve mice as bacteria were recovered from both the mouse blood and liver at seven and 16 days after tick bites. The female adults successfully emitted the bacteria into uninfected blood after three or more days of tick attachment, when fed via membrane feeding system. Histochemical staining showed the presence of bacteria in salivary glands and muscle tissues of partially engorged adult ticks, which had molted from the infected nymphs. These results confirm the vector competence of I. ricinus for B. birtlesii and represent the first in vivo demonstration of a Bartonella sp. transmission by ticks. Consequently, bartonelloses should be now included in the differential diagnosis for patients exposed to tick bites.

http://www.plosntds.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0001186

It has long been known that ticks harbor Bartonella and that humans who have Lyme disease may also have Bartonellosis. However, the actual transmission of Bartonella from tick to host has not been demonstrated until a mouse study by Drs Reis and colleagues was published in May 2011. The study is available free on line for those interested. “This work represents the first in vivo demonstration of a Bartonella sp. transmission by ticks. It . . . corroborate[s] a prospect that ticks play a role in the natural cycles of some of the bartonellae including those pathogenic for humans. Consequently, bartonelloses should be included in the differential diagnosis for patients exposed to tick bites.”
The study also found that transstadial transmission is high.  This means that bartonella  survive in the tick through the molt from one life stage to another, for example from nymphal ticks to adult ticks. It had been thought that the possible mechanism of transmission of bartonella might be through contaminated tick feces.  LymeDisease.org funded a study at UC Davis pursuing this theory. However, this study confirms that transmission to the host occurs with saliva and not through contaminated feces.

See full story:

http://www.lymedisease.org/news/lymepolicywonk/905.html

‘We don’t know what’s wrong’
Thursday, 26 August 2010
Image

By HANNAH CONNORTON
    
It started with a headache

NARRAGANSETT – Last summer, things were looking good for James Grande.
The musician, a Narragansett resident, had just released his third CD and was living his dream as a professional musician. He had three interns from URI and was booked four to six nights a week to play gigs.
He had no idea that that he would soon be overcome with symptoms of an illness doctors would fail to diagnose, and misdiagnose again and again, that would throw his life into a whirlwind of pain and confusion for over a year.

Read Story here:

http://www.ricentral.com/content/view/281353/236

ADVANCED TOPICS IN      

LYME DISEASE

DIAGNOSTIC HINTS AND TREATMENT

GUIDELINES FOR LYME AND OTHER

TICK BORNE ILLNESSES

 

Sixteenth Edition

Copyright October, 2008

JOSEPH J. BURRASCANO JR., M.D.

Board Member,

International Lyme and Associated             

Diseases Society

See Guideline here:

http://www.publichealthalert.org/pdf/LYMDXRX%202008-October.pdf

May 13, 2008 with the description: Daryl Hall talks about Lyme Disease

http://vodpod.com/watch/719144-daryl-hall-lyme-disease-interview