Lyme Disease Halifax

Lyme Disease – Information on Lyme Disease- Life stories of Lyme disease

image from halifax.ca

Halifax.ca’s Invasive Species warnings:
The black legged tick has been positively identified in Admiral’s Cove Park in Bedford.

read more: http://www.halifax.ca/environment/InvasiveSpecies.html

bsichel of Media Corp wrote:
Nova Scotia has seen 48 cases of Lyme disease since its first reporting in 2002, according to the Department of Health Promotion and Protection. This month’s cases in Bedford prompted a controversial plan by city council to use a powerful pesticide in the park – a plan quickly nixed by the provincial NDP government as it came to light that the pesticide is not approved for use in Canada. Bedford councillor Tim Outhit and the Chronicle-Herald’s editorial team have both condemned the province’s decision.

Read More: http://halifax.mediacoop.ca/story/ticks-move-weather/3736

Halifax metro posted article June 10, 2010
Tanya Payzant of Bedford son Bradly’s contrated Lyme Disease. They live in Admirals Cove. Her son is taking antibiotics for the Arthritis condition in his knee which is caused by the Lyme Disease with no effect.

read more:http://www.metronews.ca/halifax/local/article/547263–lyme-disease-exacts-physical-financial-tolls

As you can see by the date we have been aware of Lyme disease in our area for a long time….

cbc:
Ticks that carry Lyme disease are considered “established” around Lunenberg, N.S., along Lake Erie in Ontario, and parts of southern B.C.

An area near Halifax and one in southeastern Manitoba are also under investigation for the ticks.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/health/story/2006/04/19/Lyme-disease060419.html#ixzz0uE34atp3

Health Minister Maureen MacDonald’s decided to prevent the city from spraying pathways in the park in effort to control deer ticks that carry Lyme disease.
Chronicle herald has full story

http://thechronicleherald.ca/Editorials/1188482.html

…I cant even explain how utterly touched I am that you did this for me, Thankyou soooo much… I promise to put it to good use…you both got me choked right up…yup … love you both  !!!!   ing  xo

For Ingrid

24 comments

Denise and I are very sorry to hear that you have Lyme Disease.  We hope that maybe this blog will bring you some peace  during these difficult times and allow you to  help spread awareness of this terrible disease.  You are not alone and with you sharing your story it will let other people effected by Lyme Disease know that they are not alone. We wish you all the BEST!

Love

Derek & Denise

Halifax News Net

Published on July 31, 2009

By Lindsay Jones – The Weekly News

There are more reports of blacklegged ticks in the metro area this summer, but so far, none have tested positive for Lyme disease outside of the established area of Bedford.
Haligonians have discovered and submitted about 40 blacklegged ticks so far this summer – up from about a half dozen turned in last year, says Andrew Hebda, a zoologist at the Museum of Natural History.
“In part, there’s increased awareness so people are looking for ticks,” Hebda said.
“The other thing is … people are seeing a lot more ticks.”
Dog or wood ticks, which don’t carry diseases, are now being found in large numbers both in peninsular Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford and Sackville. The public has brought about 90 of them to the museum so far this summer, Hebda added.
Blacklegged ticks have been found in Halifax, specifically in Spryfield, York Redoubt National Historic Site and Fergusons Cove, as well as Fergusons Cove. None have been found to carry Lyme disease.
“The issue with blacklegged ticks is they’re been moved around by birds … and where we’re finding them is pretty well scattered throughout the province in random places,” Hebda said.
Blacklegged ticks are brown to reddish-orange, lack white markings on their backs and are much smaller than dog ticks. Their legs aren’t necessarily black.
When they’re hungry, they climb up tall grass or short shrubs and hang on with their front legs until a person or animal walks by. If they’re knocked off the plant, they start climbing up the body – rarely above the waistline – before they start embedding. Ticks found in the scalp line are usually dog ticks.

BLACKLEGGED TICKS AND LYME DISEASE

The earliest and most common symptom of Lyme disease is a bull’s-eye rash at the site of a tick bite. Other symptoms include fever, fatigue, muscle aches and headaches.
Lyme disease can be cured with antibiotics if detected early.
The disease can lead to more serious illnesses such as facial palsy (a weakening of facial muscles) and heart or chronic joint problems if untreated, though they’re rare.
Nova Scotia’s Department of Health Promotion and Protection suggests the top ways to avoid getting Lyme disease:
* Protect yourself from ticks by using insect repellent containing DEET.
* Cover as much skin as possible when outdoors.
* Check yourself and your children for ticks after outdoor activities in areas where blacklegged ticks are established.
Source: Department of Health Promotion
and Protection

“If you go for a walk in the woods, stick to the path,” Hebda said. “Keep your grass a little bit lower.”
A blacklegged tick may start feeding 24 to 48 hours after it lands on you. Hebda suggested checking for ticks by feeling for new bumps on the skin after returning from a walk. If you discover a tick, don’t use Vaseline or oil. Grab the tick firmly at the base and pull it straight out.
“We need all the feeding bits to be able to confirm the identification,” he said. “And if you leave some bits inside you they could get infected.”
He asked that people put the tick in a vial or tape it to a piece of cardstock and bring it into the museum on Summer Street in Halifax, or to any Department of Natural Resources office in the province. Jot down as much information as possible about the area the tick was found, and where it may have been picked up.
“The more information that accompanies it the better, because we’re trying to confirm where are all the tick species in the province, when are they appearing and if any diseases appear,” Hebda said.
The areas where blacklegged ticks have tested positive for Lyme disease include the Admiral’s Cove Park area in Bedford, andBedfordand Shelburne counties.
lindsayleejones@gmail.com

See Article:

http://www.halifaxnewsnet.ca/Business/2009-07-31/article-989452/Ticks-carrying-Lyme-disease-found-only-in-certain-areas/1