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June 18, 2014

In July of 2012 Babesia odocoilei was determined to be the cause of death of a game ranched elk in central Saskatchewan. Another 10 bull elk on the farm were suspected of having died of this parasite within the previous few weeks but unfortunately autopsies were not performed to confirm the diagnosis. This was the first report of Babesia odocoilei in Canada. Babesia odocoilei is a single-celled parasite that infects and destroys red blood cells causing infected animals to become anemic, lethargic and to lose weight. The parasite is transmitted by ticks and to date the only species known to be a competent vector for this parasite is Ixodes scapularis, the blacklegged or deer tick, although Dermacentor spp. have been implicated in some cases. Ixodes scapularis is not endemic to Saskatchewan.

Babesia odocoilei is endemic in white-tailed deer in the southern and eastern United States with prevalence exceeding 50% in some areas. Infections have also been reported in the north-central and north-eastern US. The parasite natural infects other cervid and bovid species and these infections are often fatal in elk, reindeer and caribou.

To investigate this novel disease occurrence further, the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative (CWHC), Western and Northern Region, along with other researchers at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) initiated a study to assess the prevalence of infection in farmed and wild cervids in Saskatchewan, both prospectively, using ongoing submissions to our diagnostic lab, and retrospectively, using formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues archived from diagnostic cases dating back to 1970. We first validated techniques and primers for a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test specific for B. odocoilei and have begun the process of testing spleens from these cases. Although testing and analysis is not complete we have so far confirmed B. odocoilei infection in one other game farmed elk and in a wild white-tailed deer in the province (see map). Preliminary results have detected other positive cases but we are doing additional testing to confirm the results.

This work has several important outcomes. First it has allowed us to develop PCR diagnostic tools to identify a disease agent which would not normally be detected during autopsy of an animal; anemia and weight loss would be observed, but B. odocoilei can only be detected with blood smears or by using PCR. These tests are not normally undertaken, especially if the disease is not thought to occur in the area. Secondly, we have determined this parasite occurs sporadically in the province but to date we have not identified any endemic foci. Since to our knowledge B. odocoilei can only be transmitted by Ixodes scapularis, a tick not native to Saskatchewan, it raises the question of how these animals are becoming infected. It is likely that B. odocoilei infected I. scapularis ticks are being transported to Saskatchewan on migratory birds. Previously researchers have shown that between 0.35 and 2.2 % of migratory birds carry these ticks, which translates to between 50 million to 175 million Ixodes scapularis ticks being dispersed across Canada each spring by migratory birds. The sporadic occurrence of B. odocoilei infections in Saskatchewan cervids has interesting parallels to the sporadic occurrence of Lyme disease in the province, another disease that requires Ixodes scapularis for transmission. In this latter case the ticks present on migratory birds are infected with Borrellia burgdorferi , the bacterium responsible for Lyme disease.

Read full story here:

http://www.healthywildlife.ca/babesia-odocoilei-recently-detected-in-canada/

http://horsetalk.co.nz/2013/05/28/dangers-australia-paralysis-tick-revealed/#axzz2UaVhLuBW

Lone Stars

14 comments
January 15, 2013
Like their facebook page-great pictures and resource !!!
https://www.facebook.com/TickEncounter

Dr. Mike Dryden, TickEncounter’s tick guy in Kansas sent along their first report of ticks for 2013. A senior veterinary student took two adult A. americanum off a horse yesterday. One was engorged. Even with the mild winter in Kansas, seeing Lone Stars in January is very unusual. Thanks for the update, Mike.

First study on birds as hosts of Lyme Disease

09.01.2013

Researchers at the University of Coimbra in Portugal lead the first study on the role of birds as reservoir hosts of the bacterium that causes Lyme borreliosis. The blackbird is a major reservoir host of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., responsible for Lyme disease – a disease that, if not treated at an early stage, causes severe lesions in the neurological, dermatological and articular systems.

This is the main conclusion of the first study in Portugal focused on the role of birds as agents for spread of infectious disease and as a reservoir of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., which is maintained in nature by various groups of vertebrates, including birds and some species of mammals and reptiles. This bacterium is transmitted by ticks, especially Ixodes ricinus.

Funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT), the study was developed over the past three years by a team of five researchers from the University of Coimbra, Center for the Study of Infectious Disease Vectors and the Dr. Ricardo Jorge National Institute of Health and the University of Neuchâtel (Switzerland).

Lyme disease, whose incidence is particularly high in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, was discovered for the first time in Portugal in 1989, and the first case was diagnosed in the region of Évora. Since then, about 35 new cases occur annually.

Although the incidence of disease is low in Portugal, “it is important to be informed about the risk of transmission of this disease and how to prevent it because the diagnosis is difficult due to the fact that early symptoms are similar to other diseases. This research provides valuable information to define the areas of risk and factors that influence the emergence of diseases transmitted by ticks and possibly prevent disease outbreaks”, states Cláudia Norte, coordinator of the study, which has already been published in international journals Environmental Microbiology and Experimental Applied Acarology.

Moreover, the researcher continues, “More and more people travel to other countries, including in areas where prevalence is high. Information is essential to take proper care”. “Thus”, she advises, “The use of light-colored clothes for a walk in the countryside or in the woods, where there are ticks normally, and looking to see if any tick is lodged in the body are a good idea. If so, remove it as soon as possible because the bacterium takes a few hours to pass effectively to a human. After the bite, if the disease is not properly treated with antibiotics at an early stage, bacteria can spread throughout the body and cause serious injury at neurological, cardiac and articular levels”.

The study also allowed the identification of a new strain of bacterium in Portugal – B. turdi – comprised by the capture of birds abundant in Portugal (about 20 species) for collecting blood samples and other tissues and ticks which were parasites on these birds. These samples have been evaluated at the molecular level to verify that  they were infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi s.l.

Plants were harvested at Tapada de Mafra and Mata do Choupal, monthly, for one year to assess seasonal variations in the abundance, distribution and infestation of ticks. With this approach, the researchers obtained information on what types of birds contribute most to the maintenance of different species of ticks and of course to the pathogens that may be carried.

See Article here:

http://english.pravda.ru/science/tech/09-01-2013/123426-study_birds-0/

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/opinion/letters/Lyme+disease+songbirds/6944942/story.html

EDMONTON JOURNAL JULY 17, 2012 Re: “Lyme-carrying ticks here, researcher says,” the Journal, July 11.

The presence of the blacklegged tick in Alberta is not a new revelation.

Many years ago, our research team documented the first record of this tick species on a Swainson’s Thrush in Alberta, collected on May 19, 1998. In fact, we have reported blacklegged ticks collected from birds in Alberta in two peer-reviewed scientific journals, in 2001 and 2005 respectively.

In the Journal article on his research, Daniel Fitzgerald at the University of Alberta said it was possible that climate change is a factor for blacklegged ticks in Alberta. But there is no mention that migratory songbirds play an integral role in wide dispersal of bird-feeding ticks.

Weather data for Edmonton listing the mean daily temperatures during the past 50 years show climate change has nil or no effect on blacklegged tick survival in Alberta.

The provincial government and the medical profession have been oblivious to what is happening in nature while songbirds introduce Lyme disease vector ticks into Alberta each year.

John D. Scott, research scientist, Lyme Disease Association of Ontario, Fergus, Ont.

Sorry, will update later.

Alberta now admits they have a lot of Lyme…and their map only reflects those areas with contributing veterinarians.

http://edmonton.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=719290&playlistId=1.875536&binId=1.822997

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/touch/health/story.html?id=6919724

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Michael Haynes at 10:04 AM

New Information about Lyme Disease in Nova Scotia

On page 14 of the 2nd edition of Trails of Halifax Regional Municipality, I state that the American Dog Tick is present in Nova Scotia, but carries “no known dangerous diseases.” Although this was apparently true when I wrote the manuscript in early 2010, a recently released study makes this now incorrect.

In an article published on August 11 in the Chronicle-Herald, it said: “Provincial records, kept since 2002, show that there have been 50 cases of Lyme disease treated in Nova Scotia, and 39 of those inflicted got the illness in this province.”

“Lyme disease is an inflammatory illness causing swelling of the joints, fever, fatigue, headache and muscle aches. It can lead to heart problems and chronic joint trouble if left untreated”, and symptoms may take years to appear. They are often difficult to correctly diagnose as Lyme Disease, due to their symptomatic similarity with other health problems and the fact that they arise long after the tick incident has been forgotten.

See full link:

http://hikinghrm.blogspot.ca/2010/08/new-information-about-lyme-disease-in.html?m=1

Dogs with Lyme disease on rise
Adam MacInnis, Published on May 28, 2012
Pictou County vets are finding a large number of animals with ticks this year. Numerous have tested positive for Lyme disease, a tick-borne illness. Pictured is Cherie Smith with a Dalmation named Sally at the East River Animal Hospital.

Vet clinics throughout the county are reporting incidents of dogs with Lyme disease, a illness transmitted by black legged ticks which are now known to populate various areas of the county. Dr. Brenda Spence-MacLeod of the Pictou Veterinary Clinic said she has had two confirmed cases this spring of dogs with Lyme disease with the most recent confirmation arriving just last week. Like many other clinics in the county, she is seeing more canines coming in with ticks and tick bites, which is something that people in this area had never had to think about in the past. Even last year, she said she didn’t see it as much of a problem. “I am more concerned about it this year,” she said. She said that there are a lot of dogs who aren’t tested who could also be carrying the disease, but just aren’t showing clinical signs. Dr. Kathryn Finlayson of the East River Animal Hospital said she’s tested about 50 dogs over the last year with five coming back positive for Lyme disease. She was able to successfully treat four while the fifth had to be euthenized.

See full story:
http://m.ngnews.ca/News/Local/2012-05-28/article-2990211/Dogs-with-Lyme-disease-on-rise/1

California Lyme Disease Association's photo.

Article Citation: John D. Scott, John F. Anderson, and Lance A. Durden (2012) Widespread Dispersal of Borrelia burgdorferi–Infected Ticks Collected from Songbirds Across Canada. Journal of Parasitology: February 2012, Vol. 98, No. 1, pp. 49-59.

doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1645/GE-2874.1

ECTOPARASITOLOGY

Widespread Dispersal of Borrelia burgdorferi–Infected Ticks Collected from Songbirds Across Canada

John D. Scott, John F. Anderson*, and Lance A. Durden†

Research Division, Lyme Disease Association of Ontario, 365 St. David St. South, Fergus, Ontario, Canada N1M 2L7. e-mail: jkscott@bserv.com

ABSTRACT:

Millions of Lyme disease vector ticks are dispersed annually by songbirds across Canada, but often overlooked as the source of infection. For clarity on vector distribution, we sampled 481 ticks (12 species and 3 undetermined ticks) from 211 songbirds (42 species/subspecies) nationwide. Using PCR, 52 (29.5%) of 176 Ixodes ticks tested were positive for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. Immature blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, collected from infested songbirds had a B. burgdorferi infection prevalence of 36% (larvae, 48%; nymphs, 31%). Notably, Ixodes affinis is reported in Canada for the first time and, similarly, Ixodes auritulus for the initial time in the Yukon. Firsts for bird-parasitizing ticks include I. scapularis in Quebec and Saskatchewan. We provide the first records of 3 tick species cofeeding on passerines (song sparrow, Swainson’s thrush). New host records reveal I. scapularis on the blackpoll warbler and Nashville warbler. We furnish the following first Canadian reports of B. burgdorferi–positive ticks: I. scapularis on chipping sparrow, house wren, indigo bunting; I. auritulus on Bewick’s wren; and I. spinipalpis on a Bewick’s wren and song sparrow. First records of B. burgdorferi–infected ticks on songbirds include the following: the rabbit-associated tick, Ixodes dentatus, in western Canada; I. scapularis in Quebec, Saskatchewan, northern New Brunswick, northern Ontario; and Ixodes spinipalpis (collected in British Columbia). The presence of B. burgdorferi in Ixodes larvae suggests reservoir competency in 9 passerines (Bewick’s wren, common yellowthroat, dark-eyed junco, Oregon junco, red-winged blackbird, song sparrow, Swainson’s thrush, swamp sparrow, and white-throated sparrow). We report transstadial transmission (larva to nymph) of B. burgdorferi in I. auritulus. Data suggest a possible 4-tick, i.e., I. angustus, I. auritulus, I. pacificus, and I. spinipalpis, enzootic cycle of B. burgdorferi on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Our results suggest that songbirds infested with B. burgdorferi–infected ticks have the potential to start new tick populations endemic for Lyme disease. Because songbirds disperse B. burgdorferi–infected ticks outside their anticipated range, health-care providers are advised that people can contract Lyme disease locally without any history of travel.

Received: May 26, 2011; Revised: August 16, 2011; Accepted: August 24, 2011

* Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station, 123 Huntington St., New Haven, Connecticut 06511.

† Department of Biology, Georgia Southern University, 69 Georgia Ave., Statesboro, Georgia 30460-8402.

See link:

http://www.journalofparasitology.org/doi/abs/10.1645/GE-2874.1?journalCode=para

Keep yourself tick-free

By Jenna Wootton

Tick season is off to an early start this year, thanks to a milder winter and an early spring warm spell. There have already been reported cases of tick bites, so best to be on your guard, as Ontario cottage country is becoming a more popular spot for ticks to settle these days. While they’re generally more prevalent in the United States, climate change is helping to move these creatures north. Established populations are reported in Ontario at Long Point, Point Pelee National Park, Rondeau Provincial Park, Turkey Point, Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area, and St. Lawrence Islands National Park in the Thousand Islands. In fact, “the St. Lawrence River and Thousand Islands are hot spots right now,” says Mary Peterson, a registered nurse on the communicable disease team at Kingston Public Health. In 2011, they received 345 ticks for analysis, up from 140 in 2010.

But if you’re not in one of these areas, don’t be complacent: The ticks are carried by small animals such as rodents and foxes, but also by birds and deer, so they have the potential to be found farther afield. We’ve even heard of someone being infected by a tick bite in Algonquin Park.

Why the fuss? Tick bites are usually painless but they may cause you to contract Lyme disease, a disease caused by a bacteria (Borrelia burgdorferi) carried by blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis, formerly called deer ticks). If the infection is caught within a few days of your tick bite, antibiotics usually produce a full recovery. When left longer, treatment may require months of antibiotics. If it’s left untreated too long, it may not be possible to cure the disease, only to manage the symptoms. As Peterson explains, “After too long, you can get rid of the bacteria, but the damage will likely already be done to joints, muscles, and the neurological system.” According to Ontario’s Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, in the long term, the disease can attack the central nervous system, brain, or heart. But, don’t worry; there are lots of ways you can keep yourself—as well as your friends and family—safe at the cottage.

Know what ticks look like. In the summer, ticks are in their nymph stage, and they can be as small as a pepper flake, says Peterson. Once they’ve reached adulthood, “you should have no trouble identifying them.” Adult ticks—before a meal—look like small, thin beetles that are brown and black in colour. Once they start feeding they will balloon up and be more rounded in shape. Not surprisingly, because they can go undetected so easily in the nymph phase, it is the stage when most people are infected with Lyme disease, according to the Ontario Public Health Division.

See link:

http://cottagelife.com/47478/environment/safety-environment/keep-yourself-tick-free#comment-4474

EUREKA- A rare caribou that was suffering from paralysis from a tick bite was recently found near Eureka.

The female was one of 19 caribou wearing a radio collar and was part of a herd that migrated from British Columbia into the Salish Mountains.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials say she appeared to be dead on the radio signal because she wasn’t moving.

FWP employees then set out to look for the animal and she was found to be suffering from the effects of tick paralysis and given two bags of IV fluid.

“It was pretty fortunate that we were able to come upon her quick enough and get her off the mountain and to a veterinarian to treat this tick issue. She probably would’ve perished,” FWP Wildlife Manager Jim Williams explained.

Canada has been working to revive their caribou population and if their program is a success, the animals would once again roam through northwest Montana on a more regular basis.

(photo courtesy Montana FWP)

See link here:

http://www.kpax.com/mobile/news/rare-caribou-found-near-eureka/

The reported number of cases of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, is thought to have increased in the UK over the past decade, but consistent surveillance data are lacking. Here the prevalence of B. burgdorferi in ticks attached to pet dogs was examined – using them as sentinels for human disease risk. Dogs give a good indication of the exposure of their human owners to infected ticks, since they largely share the same environment and visit the same outdoor areas. PCR was used to test 739 tick samples collected from 3534 dogs selected at random as they visited veterinary practices over a period of six months. Overall, the prevalence of infected ticks on all dogs was 0.5% giving an estimated 481 infected ticks per 100,000 dogs. The data suggest that the prevalence of Borrelia in the UK tick population is considerably higher than most recent estimates indicate.

See Article here:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0147957111001287

On December 12/2012 Canlyme printed this story …
http://canlyme.com/2012/12/12/misinformation-sent-to-all-nova-scotia-mlas-and-mps-by-chief-medical-officer-of-nova-scotia-robert-strang/ regarding a letter that was sent out to ALL MP/MLA’s regarding Lyme disease in Nova Scotia .  It seems I am not the only one upset about this letter.  One of the lines I was most upset with, because it rang so true, was not in the original “Strang Letter” , it was in the rebuttal from The Canlyme website…..
“Canadian Infectious Disease doctors Canada wide have refused in writing to see any patient that did not pass that flawed protocol “.
That sentence directly applied to me, as I too could not be seen here in Nova Scotia by Infectious disease, and I also know of others. I also have it in writing,  not once, but twice  !!!!!  I decided to enquire about the contents of the letter (which would be used to educate the public and squash public fear) but it was more like pulling teeth.  I emailed all 52 constituents to see what they thought. The responses were varied, to say the least. What I received was anything from no to yes, through a third party,  to pretty much ….. you may as well take a hike.  It will take awhile to get these posted…. but here’s a small taste.
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MLA for Lunenburg West (endemic jurisdiction Lunenburg and Queens Co.)

He is Ministerial Assistant to the Department of Health and Wellness.

From: ns_hottie@hotmail.com
To: gary.ramey.mla@eastlink.ca
Subject: Re: Lyme disease in Nova Scotia
Date: Mon, 17 Dec 2012 23:57:25 -0300
Dec 17, 2012
This note is in regard to Dr. Strang /Chief Medical Office (DHW) letter regarding Lyme disease. This letter was sent out to all MLA/MP dated November 28, 2012 . Could you please confirm that your office has received this letter from him.
Thank you in advance,
Ingrid
—————————————————————————————————–
From: ingrid
Sent: Wednesday, December 19, 2012 10:35 AM
To: gary.ramey.mla@eastlink.ca
Dear Constituent,
I sent you an email two days ago and have not had a response yet. Do you have someone that answers emails from the people that elected you?  As an elected member I would expect at least that. The only question I had, at that time, was if you received the letter from Dr. Strang/Chief Medical Officer of Health regarding Lyme disease?  Lyme disease is a province wide issue. However, now I am very dismayed that I have not received any response …..PLEASE RESPOND!!
Sincerely Ingrid
—————————————————————————————————-
From: gary.ramey.mla@eastlink.ca
To: ns_hottie@hotmail.com
Subject: Re:
Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2012 14:35:54 -0400
Dear Mrs XXXXXX :
I apologize for not responding sooner as I thought this was a hoax. Let me explain why.  It is addressed to Dear Constituent. I am the MLA for Lunenburg West, although technically I suppose I am  my own constituent. I have no idea if you are even a constituent of mine as you have not identified your home community, and I respond, as much as possible, to my own constituents first.   I get many e-mails per day along with many phone calls.  I try to respond to everyone as soon as possible , but events at this time of year often take me out of the office, and I am a bit slower at getting back  As I indicated, I thought the bizarre salutation made this a hoax.  I answer all my own e-mails, as I am the elected representative, and as such I am the one who should and does respond.  I am not sure why a two day response window would cause you to  be dismayed, but in answer to your question, I did receive a letter from Dr. Strang, and I have referred your inquiry to his office
Best Wishes for a Happy Holiday Season.
Gary
—————————————————————————————————–
From: ingrid
Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2013 3:26 PM
To: gary.ramey.mla@eastlink.ca
Subject: FW: LYME DISEASE/HOAX/STRANG LETTER
constituent – a member of a constituency; a citizen who is represented in a government by officials for whom he or she votes; “needs continued support by constituents to be re-elected”

Attention: RE: LYME DISEASE/HOAX/STRANG LETTER
Tuesday Janruary 01, 2013
Dear Mr. Gary Ramey MLA Lunenburg West,
HOAX ????
WOW… JUST WOW !!!!
Thankyou very much for your note and addressing my inappropriate verbatim and usage of the word ” constitiuent”. It absolutly astounds me that someone with part of your Bio. Premier Darryl Dexter’s Ministerial Assistant for the Department of Health and a former board memeber of Bonnie Lea farm (so eleqauntly-I might add) took a full paragraph to address. Were you trying to be rude, belittling or were you just trying to avoid this issue of Lyme disease and the “letter” all together?
While I do not live in “YOUR” endemic area, Lyme disease is a serious Province wide issue!!!!
As being our Premier’s Ministerial Assistant I would assume that you would have been one of the first to have been privy to the letter “Lyme disease in Nova Scotia” by our Chief Medical Officer-Dr. Robert Strang, before it was sent out. I’m perplexed as to why you felt the need to address the “bizzare” salutation in great detail, rather than the important issue at hand. Why did you forward my inquiry to Dr. Strang’s office? Our Premier has first hand knowledge of the issues with Lyme disease in this province, have you spoke to him regarding Lyme disease? My question was to you Mr. Ramey, more importantly, what did you think of the letter?
Sincerely,
Ingrid
———————————————————————————————————————-
From: gary.ramey.mla@eastlink.ca
To: ns_hottie@hotmail.com
Subject: Re:
Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2012 14:35:54 -0400
Thank-you for your email.  I want you to know that my response to you was in no way meant to be condescending, belittling, or rude.  It is not in my nature to treat others this way, and conversely I do not enjoy being treated that way myself.  I reiterate that I thought because of the salutation that this e-mail was a hoax.  I also recollect there was something about the return e-mail address that I found strange, but I would have to go back and look at the original e-mail to check on what that was.
In any event, my role as Ministerial Assistant does not make me privy to discussions on health care policy in Nova Scotia on a regular basis, nor, in my role as Ministerial Assistant, am I consistently informed on all the issues that are the purview of the Department of Health and Wellness.  Policy discussions and health care practices are in the arena of the minister in consultation with experts in their respective fields, of which Dr. Strang would be one. In 2009, when our government was elected, we merged the Department of Health and the Department of Wellness together to form one.  As a result, the minister’s role was expanded due to the formation of of one ministry from two.  The role of the Ministerial Assistant is similar to that of a Parliamentary Secretary to a federal cabinet minister.  This means I often appear on behalf of the minister at an event, or deliver a speech on his behalf.  My role is not to formulate policy, or to be consulted or briefed on the myriad of health-related issues confronting the minister.  That’s his defined role.
I recognize that Lyme Disease is a health issue in our province and, specifically in my area of the province,—–  Lunenburg and Queens Counties. I read the letter from Dr. Strang and felt it was thoughtful, comprehensive, and clear.  I know this issue continues to receive attention at the department.  Not being an expert in this field, nor having a role to play that would be applicable, I forwarded your concerns to the individuals in government who would be most likely to professionally address this issue.  It is my duty to do this, as that is my role as an MLA.
I hope this clarifies my position on this matter.
Happy New Year
Warmest regards,
Gary
———————————————————————————————————————-
From: Lyme Ing <onesicklymie.realitycheck4u@yahoo.com>
To: “gary.ramey.mla@eastlink.ca” <gary.ramey.mla@eastlink.ca>
Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2013 10:40 PM
Subject: LYME DISEASE IN NOVA SCOTIA
RE: LYME DISEASE IN NOVA SCOTIA
Dear Mr. Gary Ramey MLA Lunenburg West:
Thank-you very much for your email. The orignal intention of this email was to find out if you as an “MLA” had received the letter “Lyme disease in Nova Scotia” by Dr. Strang/Chief Medical Officer of Health dated November 28/2012 and WHEN ? It seems that as of today’s date not all MP/MLA’s have received it (some have received it through a third party). When did you recieve this letter directly from Dr. Strang’s office is the question? Please do not forward this question to Dr. Strang’s office (I have his email) as this question was not posed to him it was directed at you soley as your role as an MLA with Lunenburg being an endemic area, which is in your arena as an MLA.
Please note:
I have changed my email address from  ns_hottie@hotmail.com (the email address you found strange)  to  onesicklymie.realitycheck4U@yahoo.com maybe we can stay focused on the task at hand , and not skirt the issue.
Happy New Year,
Sincerely,
Ingrid
**** Still awaiting response…!!! ****
—————————————————————————————————–

Dartmouth East-Andrew Younger MLA

From: ns_hottie@hotmail.com
Subject: RE: Lyme disease in Nova Scotia
Date: Tue, 18 Dec 2012 00:05:22 -0300
Dec 17, 2012
This note is in regard to Dr. Strang /Chief Medical Office (DHW) letter regarding Lyme disease. This letter was sent out to all MLA/MP dated November 28, 2012 . Could you please confirm that your office has received this letter from him.
Thank you in advance,
Ingrid
————————————————————————————————-
From: ingrid (ns_hottie@hotmail.com]
Sent: December-18-12 1:29 PM
To: Office of Andrew Younger MLA
Subject: RE: Lyme disease in Nova Scotia
Do you have someone that responds to emails?
————————————————————————————————
From: info@andrewyounger.ca
To: ns_hottie@hotmail.com
Subject: RE: Lyme disease in Nova Scotia
Date: Tue, 18 Dec 2012 18:43:17 +0000
Yes Ms. XXXXXX, I respond to emails on behalf of Andrew’s office.
However, I wanted to check with Andrew about a response to your query.
This constituency office has never received any missive from Dr. Strang regarding Lyme disease, nor any other topic in recent memory. Neither has Andrew’s Liberal Party office (the caucus office) in downtown Halifax.
At this point in time, we have yet to find an MLA who is in receipt of this message from Dr. Strang regarding Lyme disease.
What we have received, is an email “in response to” Dr. Strang’s mystery message stating that Dr. Strang’s letter contains “some serious misinformation”. That email has been forwarded to Andrew, via this office.
We hope that answers your question.
Regards,
Patti Tabor
_______________________________________
Patti Tabor | Constituency Assistant
Office of Andrew Younger
MLA – Dartmouth East
73 Tacoma Drive, Suite 600 |
Dartmouth | Nova Scotia | B2W 3Y6
T: 902.406.4420 | F: 902.406.4421 | E: info@andrewyounger.ca
——————————————————————————————–

Vicki Conrad MLA Queens

Ingrid, on behalf of Vicki Conrad, thank you for your email and my apologies for not responding earlier.  We have received the letter from Dr. Strang and we have been advised that Dr. Strang will be addressed the inquiry in the new year.
Seasons’s Greetings & Happy New Year!
Judi Milne, Constituency Assistant
We Build Ships – check it out: www.shipsstarthere.ca
VICKI CONRAD, MLA Queens
Ministerial Assistant to Transportation & Infrastructure & Caucus Chair
PO Box 430, 43 Carten St., Liverpool, NS  B0T 1K0
902-354-5203, fax 1-902-354-5247, toll free 1-888-354-5203
www.vickiconrad.ca
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As a footnote (from Canlyme) :

Local MLAs hear requests for Lyme disease vigilance

NEW GLASGOW – Pictou County’s three MLAs and several county councilors got educated about Lyme disease from those suffering from the disease. They also received a long list of items the delegation wants instituted into Nova Scotia’s detection and treatment of the disease during a meeting on Monday at Justice Minister Ross Landry’s Pictou Centre constituency office. “We did our best,” delegation member Alice Lees said. “There are strong intentions and they’ve information that will be helpful.” Besides Landry, Energy and Natural Resources Minister Charlie Parker and Pictou East MLA Clarrie MacKinnon, municipal councilors in attendance included Deputy Warden Andy Thompson, Sally Fraser, Debi Wadden and Jamie Davidson. “We know Lyme disease is a serious and real problem,” Landry said. “The big thing is getting the medical and health communities and the public educated. We met to help assure that various departments are aware of this.” The delegation members want the Medical Act of Nova Scotia updated to ensure those with Lyme disease receive the same guarantee former Health Minister Maureen MacDonald asserted “that all Nova Scotians receive the best possible care from highly qualified and trained doctors.”


DOWNLOAD THE FULL ARTICLE…..

http://www.dovepress.com/morgellons-disease-analysis-of-a-population-with-clinically-confirmed–peer-reviewed-article-CCID-MVP

Back to Dovepress Journal: Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology

Morgellons disease: Analysis of a population with clinically confirmed microscopic subcutaneous fibers of unknown etiology
Original Research
(8235) Views  (2371) Full article downloads
Authors: Virginia R Savely, Raphael B Stricker
Published Date May 2010
Volume 2010:3 Pages 67 – 78
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S9520
Virginia R Savely1, Raphael B Stricker2
1TBD Medical Associates, San Francisco, CA, USA; 2International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA
Background: Morgellons disease is a controversial illness in which patients complain of stinging, burning, and biting sensations under the skin. Unusual subcutaneous fibers are the unique objective finding. The etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, and diagnostic criteria have yet to be established. Our goal was to identify prevalent symptoms in patients with clinically confirmed subcutaneous fibers in order to develop a case definition for Morgellons disease.
Methods: Patients with subcutaneous fibers observed on physical examination (designated as the fiber group) were evaluated using a data extraction tool that measured clinical and demographic characteristics. The prevalence of symptoms common to the fiber group was then compared with the prevalence of these symptoms in patients with Lyme disease and no complaints of skin fibers.
Results: The fiber group consisted of 122 patients. Significant findings in this group were an association with tick-borne diseases and hypothyroidism, high numbers from two states (Texas and California), high prevalence in middle-aged Caucasian women, and an increased prevalence of smoking and substance abuse. Although depression was noted in 29% of the fiber patients, pre-existing delusional disease was not reported. After adjusting for nonspecific symptoms, the most common symptoms reported in the fiber group were: crawling sensations under the skin; spontaneously appearing, slow-healing lesions; hyperpigmented scars when lesions heal; intense pruritus; seed-like objects, black specks, or “fuzz balls” in lesions or on intact skin; fine, thread-like fibers of varying colors in lesions and intact skin; lesions containing thick, tough, translucent fibers that are highly resistant to extraction; and a sensation of something trying to penetrate the skin from the inside out.
Conclusions: This study of the largest clinical cohort reported to date provides the basis for an accurate and clinically useful case definition for Morgellons disease.
Keywords: Morgellons, subcutaneous fibers, pruritus, delusions of parasitosis, Lyme disease, skin lesions

CBC news March 06, 2011  

Tracy Marcotullio, the shelter manager, said pet owners should be aware of Lyme disease all year, even in winter.

“The reason that we saw this case in the wintertime is because the tick that causes Lyme disease, it can take up to five or six months sometimes to see symptoms,” Marcotullio said. “This dog would have had the tick bite in the summertime, contracted the Lyme disease then, but not shown symptoms for several months.”

Read more here:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2011/03/06/nb-spca-lyme-disease.html?ref=rss

Published Friday, December 17,2010
By Erin dwyer for the Telegraph-journal

HAMPTON – The town is looking to follow the lead of neighbouring municipalities that have banned the feeding of deer.

Councillor Robert Doucet motioned to have town staff investigate the possibility of creating a bylaw much like the communities in the Kennebecasis Valley. Both Quispamsis and Rothesay have enacted ones that would see residents fined for feeding deer.

“I think we need to come up to speed with Quispamsis and Rothesay,” Doucet said. “I recommend staff do some research on other municipalities and come up with a recommendation.”

It’s not the first time the town has talked about dealing with its deer problem.

See more here:

http://telegraphjournal.canadaeast.com/city/article/1356209

 

Ticks can attack moose in droves, draining their blood and possibly killing them.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rsd2i-qFHK4

By JOHN McPHEE Health Reporter
Tue, Aug 24 – 6:44 PM

White-tailed deer will be getting a dose of pesticides along with their treats as part of an effort to fight Lyme disease in the province.

Deer bait stations are expected to be installed as part of a federal study in Bedford and outside Lunenburg next month, an official with Halifax Regional Municipality said Monday.

Similar stations have been very effective in reducing black-legged tick populations in the United States, said Richard MacLellan, manager of HRM’s sustainable environment management office.

 

Read Story here:

http://thechronicleherald.ca/NovaScotia/1198354.html

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

By David Cubberly, Special to Times Colonist
 

 

It’s astounding that a single Victoria veterinarian sees more Lyme disease in dogs yearly than are “confirmed” by the Centre for Disease Control for humans across B.C. (“Tests spot tick-borne disease in retriever,” June 26).

How can it be that we see only four to six cases a year of Lyme in humans if one vet sees a case a month of tick-borne disease in dogs (and most often Lyme)?

I hope the standard of care given Annie the retriever will one day be available to people in B.C. Right now it’s not. Annie’s vet suspected tick-borne illness, recognized the need to test for Lyme disease and knew enough to also test for other tick-borne illnesses.

Humans come to doctors with known symptoms of tick-borne illness, yet often face incomprehension or worse.

Halifax News Net

Published on July 31, 2009

By Lindsay Jones – The Weekly News

There are more reports of blacklegged ticks in the metro area this summer, but so far, none have tested positive for Lyme disease outside of the established area of Bedford.
Haligonians have discovered and submitted about 40 blacklegged ticks so far this summer – up from about a half dozen turned in last year, says Andrew Hebda, a zoologist at the Museum of Natural History.
“In part, there’s increased awareness so people are looking for ticks,” Hebda said.
“The other thing is … people are seeing a lot more ticks.”
Dog or wood ticks, which don’t carry diseases, are now being found in large numbers both in peninsular Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford and Sackville. The public has brought about 90 of them to the museum so far this summer, Hebda added.
Blacklegged ticks have been found in Halifax, specifically in Spryfield, York Redoubt National Historic Site and Fergusons Cove, as well as Fergusons Cove. None have been found to carry Lyme disease.
“The issue with blacklegged ticks is they’re been moved around by birds … and where we’re finding them is pretty well scattered throughout the province in random places,” Hebda said.
Blacklegged ticks are brown to reddish-orange, lack white markings on their backs and are much smaller than dog ticks. Their legs aren’t necessarily black.
When they’re hungry, they climb up tall grass or short shrubs and hang on with their front legs until a person or animal walks by. If they’re knocked off the plant, they start climbing up the body – rarely above the waistline – before they start embedding. Ticks found in the scalp line are usually dog ticks.

BLACKLEGGED TICKS AND LYME DISEASE

The earliest and most common symptom of Lyme disease is a bull’s-eye rash at the site of a tick bite. Other symptoms include fever, fatigue, muscle aches and headaches.
Lyme disease can be cured with antibiotics if detected early.
The disease can lead to more serious illnesses such as facial palsy (a weakening of facial muscles) and heart or chronic joint problems if untreated, though they’re rare.
Nova Scotia’s Department of Health Promotion and Protection suggests the top ways to avoid getting Lyme disease:
* Protect yourself from ticks by using insect repellent containing DEET.
* Cover as much skin as possible when outdoors.
* Check yourself and your children for ticks after outdoor activities in areas where blacklegged ticks are established.
Source: Department of Health Promotion
and Protection

“If you go for a walk in the woods, stick to the path,” Hebda said. “Keep your grass a little bit lower.”
A blacklegged tick may start feeding 24 to 48 hours after it lands on you. Hebda suggested checking for ticks by feeling for new bumps on the skin after returning from a walk. If you discover a tick, don’t use Vaseline or oil. Grab the tick firmly at the base and pull it straight out.
“We need all the feeding bits to be able to confirm the identification,” he said. “And if you leave some bits inside you they could get infected.”
He asked that people put the tick in a vial or tape it to a piece of cardstock and bring it into the museum on Summer Street in Halifax, or to any Department of Natural Resources office in the province. Jot down as much information as possible about the area the tick was found, and where it may have been picked up.
“The more information that accompanies it the better, because we’re trying to confirm where are all the tick species in the province, when are they appearing and if any diseases appear,” Hebda said.
The areas where blacklegged ticks have tested positive for Lyme disease include the Admiral’s Cove Park area in Bedford, andBedfordand Shelburne counties.
lindsayleejones@gmail.com

See Article:

http://www.halifaxnewsnet.ca/Business/2009-07-31/article-989452/Ticks-carrying-Lyme-disease-found-only-in-certain-areas/1