Lyme Disease Halifax

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I am posting this note … because I had people asking me about transmission…

Please Note: I am posting this to give you CDC’s opinion….and am in no way agreeing to thier opinion !!!

www.cdc.gov/

~a great link… a great research tool… in the search bar enter for example… put in transmission… on the first blue link that comes up .. click it… it then brings you “Lyme disease” : ancient engine of an unrecognized borreliosis pandemic?  In this document you will find : 1 document with transmission used 15 times… between humans, the CDC’s position (of which I personally no longer trust), zoonotic vectors, mice, via utero from naturally infected cows…

good site…take a peek…

http://www.ilads.org/

This is video of spirochetes and biofilm found in infected ticks throughout BC from Dr. Kindree and Dr. Banergee from the BC CDC. This video was given to Dr. Murakami by Dr. Kindree.

Published in February, 2008, this is one of the first comprehensive Lyme disease books written by a reputable Lyme Literate Medical Doctor (LLMD)—Kenneth Singleton, M.D.

With 523 pages, the book offers information on numerous Lyme-related topics, including prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and political controversy. See the Table of Contents for more information. 

Dr. Singleton, who holds both a medical degree and a Master’s degree in Public Health, began practicing medicine in 1971, after spending 7 years as Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at Wright State University. In 1997, Dr. Singleton began a private practice in suburban Baltimore where he still practices today. Before writing The Lyme Disease Solution, he co-authored a book entitled Natural Health for African Americans in 1999. He has lectured extensively and is a frequent guest on radio and TV on topics related to health, particularly Lyme disease. 

Dr. Singleton is an active member of ILADS (International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society), ACAM (American College for Advancement in Medicine), and A4M (American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine). According to his website, The Lyme Disease Solution was written to provide practical guidance for patients and practitioners in dealing with Lyme disease. In his own words:

“What I have accomplished with this 500+ page book, The Lyme Disease Solution, is to share my everyday knowledge and practical experience of 10 years as a Lyme-enlightened practitioner (who also is himself a Lyme-survivor). Although I hesitate to use the “cure” word in relation to chronic Lyme, the principles in this book have resulted in a greater than 90% response rate in my patients. At least 60% of my patients achieve long-term improvement that allows them to get off of antibiotics completely.”

                                                                   — Ken Singleton, M.D.

Lyme disease is a difficult illness to diagnose and treat, and this book offers patients and practitioners life-saving information not available anywhere else in print or on the internet. If you would like to learn more about the book before ordering it, feel free to browse these excerpts, which are available online, free of charge:

Table of ContentsIntroductionControversy and Background

SymptomsTesting and DiagnosisNatural Killer (NK) Cells

Anti-Inflammation DietMedical History and Physical Exam

Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN)Food, Diet, and Omega Fatty Acids

Hope and Positive OutlookIndex  • Antibiotic Treatment  • Herxheimer Reaction

Co-Infection Treatment  • Vitamin SupplementationProbiotics and Omega Fatty Acids

Lyme Related Sleep Problems and Insomnia

THE LYME DISEASE SOLUTION
By Ken Singleton, M.D.
Foreword by James A. Duke, Ph.D.
Paperback Book, 523 Pages, $29.95 + $7 Shipping & Handling
  Order By Phone: Order Online:
(530) 541-7200

 

  BioMed Publishing GroupP.O. Box 9012South Lake Tahoe, CA 96150www.LymeBookStore.com

Contact Us

(801) 925-2411

Disclaimer: The products offered on this web site are intended for informational and educational purposes only and are not intended to prevent, diagnose, treat, or cure disease.  The statements on this web site have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration. If you have a medical problem see a licensed physician. Copyright © 2007 BioMed   |   Advertise with us

 

http://www.lymebook.com/lyme-disease-solution

 “The doctors have a big apology to give the general public,” he says. “Infectious disease doctors don’t even believe that chronic Lyme disease exists. Their knowledge is way, way behind.”Even if doctors are convinced a patient has Lyme disease, they are reluctant to treat it if it has advanced beyond theinitial stage that requires only a few weeks of antibiotics, says Murakami.“Doctors in Canada are petrified to talk about Lyme disease,” he says.

http://www.vancouversun.com/

And what are we doing to mark Lyme disease awareness month, you may ask? Well we are launching a book! We are now accepting orders for our new book, Ending Denial – The Lyme Disease Epidemic: A Canadian Public Health Disaster (front cover pictured at left; click for larger image).

Canadians are routinely told by their doctors that Lyme does not exist in Canada and that there is no such thing as its chronic form – its most devastating form, also known as “the great imitator”. The few Canadian doctors actively involved in diagnosing and treating Lyme are frequently persecuted by their licensing authorities when treating Chronic Lyme cases according to international standards; the Canadian Blood Services do not even screen for Lyme (as most other countries do, including the US), and Canada’s Medicare system endorses only tests for Lyme known to produce false negatives — Canada’s doctors are not permitted to use tests that are internationally known to be reliable. This book examines the reasons for this corruption of medicine and erosion of public health standards in Canada.

“If you or someone you love may be suffering from Lyme disease, this book is for you. If you want to know what’s wrong with our health care system, this book is for you. If you have wondered why every conversation about our health care system in Canada and the US ends up being about money, this book is for you. Read it and bear witness to the courage of those who challenge the status quo and truly put patients first. Read it to help protect yourself from the vested interests that have kept doctors and patients in the dark about the true nature of Lyme disease. Read it to understand how blindly doing what the doctor says may be the most dangerous thing you could do for your own health.”

– Terence Young, MP Oakville, Ontario
(author of Death by Prescription

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

By David Cubberly, Special to Times Colonist
 

 

It’s astounding that a single Victoria veterinarian sees more Lyme disease in dogs yearly than are “confirmed” by the Centre for Disease Control for humans across B.C. (“Tests spot tick-borne disease in retriever,” June 26).

How can it be that we see only four to six cases a year of Lyme in humans if one vet sees a case a month of tick-borne disease in dogs (and most often Lyme)?

I hope the standard of care given Annie the retriever will one day be available to people in B.C. Right now it’s not. Annie’s vet suspected tick-borne illness, recognized the need to test for Lyme disease and knew enough to also test for other tick-borne illnesses.

Humans come to doctors with known symptoms of tick-borne illness, yet often face incomprehension or worse.

VANCOUVER – What if you picked up a crippling bacterial disease, but your doctor says it’s virtually impossible you have it? Or the doctor agrees you’re sick, but won’t treat you for fear of being drummed out of the profession?

Lyme disease patients in British Columbia say that’s what’s happening to them, and they’re being forced to look outside the mainstream medicalsystem for help.

While health officials say a few hundred Canadians contract Lyme disease each year, patient advocates claim that’s a drastic underestimate.

They say they’re given inadequate tests, denied medical treatment or told something else is causing the muscle and joint pain that leaves them unable to walk. And the few doctors willing to treat them with long-term antibiotics — sometimes administered for months intravenously — fear repercussions from their licensing bodies.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/health/People+with+Lyme+disease+they+treatment/3397141/story.html#ixzz0x4eRzKxU

 

On November 2nd, 2008, Leslie Rae Wermers, UNDER OUR SKIN’s greatest fan and an indomitable force in the Lyme disease community, died of complications from Lyme disease. Her extraordinary love, dedication and passion always will be remembered. These are interview outtakes with Leslie from the production of UNDER OUR SKIN, filmed at a Lyme memorial service in Iowa in 2007. For further information visit www.lymefighters.org.

For DVDs of UNDER OUR SKIN: www.underourskin.com

An infectious film about microbes, money and medicine.

One of the most controversial illnesses in the history of medicine, Lyme disease may be the fastest growing infectious disease in the United States. Yet each year thousands are misdiagnosed – many of them told that their symptoms are “all in their head.” This upcoming documentary investigates the shocking human, medical, and political dimensions of Lyme disease, an emerging epidemic destroying countless numbers of lives. A case study of the dangers of the confluence of money and medicine, the film brings into focus a haunting picture of our healthcare system and its inability to cope with a biological terror under our skin.

 March 2010

Critics and Lyme disease sufferers say their illness isn’t taken seriously enough and the ‘ignorance’ and ‘arrogance’ of Canadian health agencies has driven them to desperation.

http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/WFive/20091113/w5_lyme_091114/

Part 1

W5 investigation on Lyme disease: Why some Canadian doctors are misdiagnosing this crippling disease caused by a shape-shifting superbug — until it’s too late.

Marie McQuhae Lyme Disease – savemarie@yahoo.com

Sept 20, 2009

Thousands of Canadians are sounding the alarm about a silent menace. It’s Lyme disease, an illness spread by bites from ticks. The consequences can be devastating – but as history has shown — many victims don’t even know they have the disease until it’s too late..

Watch video

 

August 18, 2010

Dr. Teresa Royer MacKnight, 57, Andover, Maine

Daily Item

ANDOVER, Maine — Dr. Teresa “Terri” Royer MacKnight, 57, passed away on Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010, peacefully at her home in Andover.

She was born March 25, 1953, in Lewisburg, Pa., a daughter of Russell and Louise Royer, of New Columbia, Pa.

She graduated from Lewisburg High School, Class of 1971 and received her Doctorate of Osteopathic Medicine, Des Moines University in Iowa in 1979.

Dr. MacKnight practiced medicine in Hollywood, Fla., Seattle, Wash., Negley, Ohio, and Beaver, Pa., before moving to Maine in 1990. She practiced medicine in Rumford until being disabled by Neurologic Lyme Disease. She was one of the founders of the International Lyme and Associated Disease Society and the society’s first president in 1999.

See more:

http://dailyitem.com/obituaries/x1047881738/Dr-Teresa-Royer-MacKnight-57-Andover-Maine

…I cant even explain how utterly touched I am that you did this for me, Thankyou soooo much… I promise to put it to good use…you both got me choked right up…yup … love you both  !!!!   ing  xo

Halifax News Net

Published on July 31, 2009

By Lindsay Jones – The Weekly News

There are more reports of blacklegged ticks in the metro area this summer, but so far, none have tested positive for Lyme disease outside of the established area of Bedford.
Haligonians have discovered and submitted about 40 blacklegged ticks so far this summer – up from about a half dozen turned in last year, says Andrew Hebda, a zoologist at the Museum of Natural History.
“In part, there’s increased awareness so people are looking for ticks,” Hebda said.
“The other thing is … people are seeing a lot more ticks.”
Dog or wood ticks, which don’t carry diseases, are now being found in large numbers both in peninsular Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford and Sackville. The public has brought about 90 of them to the museum so far this summer, Hebda added.
Blacklegged ticks have been found in Halifax, specifically in Spryfield, York Redoubt National Historic Site and Fergusons Cove, as well as Fergusons Cove. None have been found to carry Lyme disease.
“The issue with blacklegged ticks is they’re been moved around by birds … and where we’re finding them is pretty well scattered throughout the province in random places,” Hebda said.
Blacklegged ticks are brown to reddish-orange, lack white markings on their backs and are much smaller than dog ticks. Their legs aren’t necessarily black.
When they’re hungry, they climb up tall grass or short shrubs and hang on with their front legs until a person or animal walks by. If they’re knocked off the plant, they start climbing up the body – rarely above the waistline – before they start embedding. Ticks found in the scalp line are usually dog ticks.

BLACKLEGGED TICKS AND LYME DISEASE

The earliest and most common symptom of Lyme disease is a bull’s-eye rash at the site of a tick bite. Other symptoms include fever, fatigue, muscle aches and headaches.
Lyme disease can be cured with antibiotics if detected early.
The disease can lead to more serious illnesses such as facial palsy (a weakening of facial muscles) and heart or chronic joint problems if untreated, though they’re rare.
Nova Scotia’s Department of Health Promotion and Protection suggests the top ways to avoid getting Lyme disease:
* Protect yourself from ticks by using insect repellent containing DEET.
* Cover as much skin as possible when outdoors.
* Check yourself and your children for ticks after outdoor activities in areas where blacklegged ticks are established.
Source: Department of Health Promotion
and Protection

“If you go for a walk in the woods, stick to the path,” Hebda said. “Keep your grass a little bit lower.”
A blacklegged tick may start feeding 24 to 48 hours after it lands on you. Hebda suggested checking for ticks by feeling for new bumps on the skin after returning from a walk. If you discover a tick, don’t use Vaseline or oil. Grab the tick firmly at the base and pull it straight out.
“We need all the feeding bits to be able to confirm the identification,” he said. “And if you leave some bits inside you they could get infected.”
He asked that people put the tick in a vial or tape it to a piece of cardstock and bring it into the museum on Summer Street in Halifax, or to any Department of Natural Resources office in the province. Jot down as much information as possible about the area the tick was found, and where it may have been picked up.
“The more information that accompanies it the better, because we’re trying to confirm where are all the tick species in the province, when are they appearing and if any diseases appear,” Hebda said.
The areas where blacklegged ticks have tested positive for Lyme disease include the Admiral’s Cove Park area in Bedford, andBedfordand Shelburne counties.
lindsayleejones@gmail.com

See Article:

http://www.halifaxnewsnet.ca/Business/2009-07-31/article-989452/Ticks-carrying-Lyme-disease-found-only-in-certain-areas/1